List Headline Image
Updated by Day Translations on Jan 10, 2015
 REPORT
18 items   8 followers   4 votes   1.14k views

German Loan Words in English

Why borrow words? For the simple reason that some words in one language do not have an exact translation in another language. English borrows a lot of words from different languages such as French, Italian, Spanish, Chinese and Japanese. English, which is a Germanic language, borrowed quite a number of German words, mostly nouns, verbs and adjectives.

Source: http://www.thelanguagejournal.com/2012/03/uber-and-other-german-loanwords.html

2

Über

Über

Über is a loanword from the German language. It is both a prefix and a word in its own right. The letter "u" has an umlaut (two dots above the letter) when spelled. As a loanword in English, über is most often used to emphasize something, to say that something is big, superior or over the top, among other things. It über denotes an increase in quantity or elevation. Über can also mean elite, superior, predominant, over, and something in excess. The actual meaning of the word über will always depend on the context in which the word is used. It is a widely used loanword in pop culture that is sometimes spelled in English as "uber" or "ueber" and appended to a word either with or without a dash.

10

Gesundheit

Gesundheit

translated as "health" but used instead of the phrase "bless you!" after a person sneezes

13

Kindergarten

Kindergarten

translation is "children garden" but used in English to refer to a place or educational institution where young children begin their education

3

Angst

Angst

anxiety or deep fear within one's self

4

Blitzkrieg

Blitzkrieg

"lightning war" is the literal translation but used to mean fast strategy or swift offensive in English

5

Bratwurst

Bratwurst

type of sausage

6

Delikatessen

Delikatessen

shop selling prepared or ready-to-eat foods

7

Doppelgänger

Doppelgänger

a look-alike of another person

8

Frankfurter

Frankfurter

another type of sausage

9

Gestalt

Gestalt

literally means "shape or form" but the word is used in psychology as well as philosophy to refer to wholeness as a result of individual concepts coming together

11

Kaputt

Kaputt

means broken

12

Kitsch

Kitsch

describes an item that is gaudy, cheap or sentimental

14

Poltergeist

Poltergeist

a ghost that is noisy and disruptive ghost

15

Pretzel

Pretzel

salty food made from baked dough

16

Sauerkraut

Sauerkraut

a boiled cabbage dish

17

Wanderlust

Wanderlust

a person's yearning to go places or travel

18

Zeitgeist

Zeitgeist

literal translation is "time ghost" but is used in English to describe the prevailing political and cultural trends of a particular time in history

Language Fun Facts - The German Language vs. Other Languages

I laughed too much at this. I know it's not true, I mean German people don't scream when they talk, but it's still funny.