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Updated by Julian Knight on Nov 20, 2015
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5 Thought-Provoking Points-of-View on Defensive Medicine

Does defensive medicine mean fewer malpractice suits?

"Most of us are familiar with the concept of defensive driving: We're taught to lower our risk of car accidents by anticipating dangerous situations that could be caused by poor road conditions or other people's mistakes. But are you familiar with defensive medicine?"

Here the authors consider trends in defensive medicine, what this newest study means for federal efforts to rein in health costs, and alternative solutions to defensive medicine. The simplest idea? Improve communication between doctors, nurses, and patients.

Health courts could help contain 'defensive medicine'

"It is disappointing that so far the presidential candidates have not expressed any opinions about one of the biggest problems that continues to raise health costs."

In this thoughtful article, Dr. Edward Volpintesta voices his opinions on the problem of defensive medicine and it's absense from the national debate on health care.

Reducing the cost of health care

"As Republican and Democratic contenders for the White House square off again in nationally televised debates, it's time to focus on what's ailing so many patients - the skyrocketing cost of health care."

In this article, the author postures that, "if candidates for the highest office in the land want to offer real solutions, they will offer a proposal under consideration in five states known as a Patients' Compensation System." Read the full article for his well-researched proposal.

80 Percent Of Neurosurgeons Now Practice Defensive Medicine

Much of the public think malpractice insurance is a big cost of health care and so they rightly think that if there were reasonable checks on lawsuit judgments health care would be affordable without government intervention.

The effect of patient demands and defensive medicine on health care costs

The effect of patient demands and defensive medicine on health care costs Health care is not and cannot function as a rational market. Posted: Thursday, February 26, 2015, 8:30 AM The Chicago-school economists and their Republican disciples in Congress argue that the answer to ballooning health care costs consists of making patients put skin in the game.