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Updated by Rajashri Venkatesh on Nov 08, 2015
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10 Protein Substitues For Vegetarians

Proteins are the building blocks of our body and meat is not the only source of protein, proves this list! Here is a list of all the best protein substitute for all the non-meat eaters.

1

Pulses

Pulses

Pulses is a general name given to plants that provide dried edible seeds. Split pulses in India are known as Dal. Dried peas and beans have about the same composition as Pulses. In tropics, pulses are second only to cereals as important sources of calories and proteins. Bengal gram ( chana dal ), red gram ( tuver dal ), green gram ( mung dal ), black gram ( urad dal ) and lentils ( masur dal ) are the most widely consumed pulses in India.

Green Peas

Sweet, chubby peapods on the vine announce the start of the spring growing season. Reach for a handful and make a dent in your daily dose of vitamin requirements. This green legume is loaded with A, B-1, B-6, C, and a supersized serving of osteoporosis-fighting K. One cup of boiled green peas has 46% of your RDA of vitamin K-1, known for maintaining bone health and helping blood to clot to prevent bleeding. Peas are high in fiber and low in fat and contain no cholesterol. Plus, they're a good source of vegetable protein.

3

Quinoa

Quinoa

One of the best reasons to enjoy quinoa is because it has a high-protein content, which makes it a great cholesterol-free and low-fat source of protein for vegetarians and vegans. According to the USDA nutrient database, 1 cup of cooked quinoa (185 g) contains 8.14 grams of protein.

Nut Butters

Nut butter provides a moderate amount of protein. With an average of 7 to 8 grams of protein per 2-tablespoon serving, almond and peanut butter are some of the nut butters with the highest protein content. This amount of protein is equivalent to what is found in an egg or 1 ounce of meat. It is a sufficient amount of protein for a snack or to supplement your protein intake at a meal, but should not be your only source of protein since you need the equivalent of about 3 to 4 ounces of protein per meal.

Chia Seeds

The seeds are 20% protein, which exceeds the protein content of most other grains and seeds. “The high-quality protein in chia seeds provides all the essential amino acids, making it a complete protein source,” says Vandana Sheth, R.D. M&F recommends you consume 1–1.5 grams of protein per pound of body weight if you’re training to build muscle, so dumping a few tablespoons of chia into your protein shake can give you an edge in the weight room.

6

Seitan

Seitan

A serving of seitan (3.5 oz) has around 118 calories, 3 grams of carbs, 24 grams of protein and is almost completely fat and cholesterol free.
You would expect a product made from wheat to be higher in carbohydrates, but seitan is made by removing all of the starch from the wheat (the source of carbs) leaving only gluten, which is mainly protein.
Notwithstanding the high protein value, due to its low content of lysine (one of the essential amino acids), seitan is not generally considered a source of complete protein.

Soybean

Fat-free (defatted) soybean meal is a significant and cheap source of protein for animal feeds and many packaged meals; soy vegetable oil is another product of processing the soybean crop. For example, soybean products such as textured vegetable protein (TVP) are ingredients in many meat and dairy analogues. Soybeans produce significantly more protein per acre than most other uses of land

Beans and Lentils

Beans and lentils are the cheapest source of protein out there. So whether you prefer kidney, garbanzo, white, black, or pinto beans, "Buy lots of cans of beans, rinse and drain them to remove 40 percent of the sodium, and use them in everything," suggests Dawn Jackson Blatner, author of The Flexitarian Diet: The Mostly Vegetarian Way to Lose Weight, Be Healthier, Prevent Disease, and Add Years to Your Life. "White beans taste delicious in pasta: garbanzo or edamame in stir-fries; black beans and pinto in burritos, tacos, and quesadillas; and lentils or kidney are great in salads and whole grain pita lunches."

9

Tofu

Tofu

Nutritionally, tofu is high in protein, low in fat, and naturally cholesterol-free. It also contains healthful phytochemicals, such as isoflavones and soy saponins. For cooking, tofu absorbs whatever flavors and marinades it is exposed to.

10

Hemp

Hemp

Foods can be classified as complete, partial, or incomplete sources of proteins. In order for a food to be classified as complete, it must contain all eight essential amino acids. Hemp is considered a complete protein because it contains all eight essential amino acids in sufficient quantities to meet the body’s needs. This also makes hemp a good alternative source of protein for vegetarians and vegans.