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Updated by Healthy Snack List on Nov 01, 2015
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Vegetable Snacks

Vegetables are whole, natural, and nutrient rich food. This makes them a great source for vitamins and minerals! With just a little bit of work they can be easily prepared into a wholesome nutritious snack!

1

Avocado

Avocado

Optimally ripe avocados are typically known for their silky, creamy texture and rich flavors (which some people describe as "nutty" or "nut-like"). Avocados owe their creamy texture to their high fat content. Not all avocados are identical in terms of fat content, however. As a general rule, smaller sized avocados tend to be more oily and higher in fat, and large sized avocados tend to be somewhat less oily and lower in fat percentage.

Avocados contain an amazing array of phytonutrients. Included are phytosterols (especially beta-sitosterol, stigmasterol, and campesterol); carotenoids (beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lutein, neochrome, neoxanthin, chrysanthemaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin, and violaxanthin); flavonoids (epicatechin and epigallocatechin 3-0-gallate); and polyhydroxylated fatty alcohols. Alpha-linolenic acid (an omega-3 fatty acid) and oleic acid are key fats provided by avocado. Avocados are a good source of pantothenic acid, dietary fiber, vitamin K, copper, folate, vitamin B6, potassium, vitamin E, and vitamin C.

Quick Tips

  • Crack a little bit of pepper and salt on top and spoon out for a delicious snack.
  • Use chopped avocados as a garnish for soup.
  • Add avocado to your favorite creamy tofu-based dressing recipe to give it extra richness and a beautiful green color.
  • Mix chopped avocados, onions, tomatoes, cilantro, lime juice and seasonings for a rich-tasting twist on traditional guacamole.
  • Spread ripe avocados on bread as a healthy replacement for mayonnaise when making a sandwich.
  • For an exceptional salad, combine sliced avocado with fennel, oranges and fresh mint.
2

Broccoli

Broccoli

This easily prepared snack comes with great health benefits and can be combined with ranch or other dressings for a quick snack. Studies have shown that broccoli may have anti-flammatory benefits, antioxidant benefits(vitamin C, carotenoids, vitamin E, manganese, and zinc), detox benefits, digestive support, cardiovascular support, eye health, and skin support. Broccoli belongs to the cruciferous vegetables, a group of vegetables known for being rich in vitamin A carotenoids, vitamin C, folic acid, and fiber. In addition broccoli is an excellent source of vitamin K, vitamin C, chromium, and folate. It is a very good source of dietary fiber, pantothenic acid, vitamin B6, vitamin E, manganese, phosphorus, choline, vitamin B1, vitamin A (in the form of carotenoids), potassium, and copper. Broccoli is also a good source of vitamin B1, magnesium, omega-3 fatty acids, protein, zinc, calcium, iron, niacin, and selenium.

Quick Tips

  • Ranch or other dipping dressing along with carrots, celery, cauliflower, tomatoes, and other vegetables for delicious vegetable tray.
  • Add broccoli florets and chopped stalks to omelets.
  • Puree cooked broccoli and cauliflower, then combine with seasonings of your choice to make a simple, yet delicious, soup.
4

Carrots

Carrots

Carrots are perhaps best known for their rich supply of the antioxidant nutrient that was actually named for them: beta-carotene. While they can be an outstanding source of this phytonutrient, carrots actually contain a fascinating combination of phytonutrients, including other carotenoids (especially alpha-carotene and lutein); hydroxycinnamic acids (including caffeic, coumaric, ferulic); anthocyanins (in the case of purple and red carrots); and polyacetylenes (especially falcarinol and falcarindiol). Carrots are an excellent source of vitamin A (in the form of carotenoids). In addition, they are a very good source of biotin, vitamin K, dietary fiber, molybdenum, potassium, vitamin B6, and vitamin C. They are a good source of manganese, niacin, vitamin B1, panthothenic acid, phosphorus, folate, copper, vitamin E, and vitamin B2.

Quick Tips

  • Shredded raw carrots and chopped carrot greens make great additions to salads.
  • Combine shredded carrots, beets and apples, and eat as a salad.
  • For quick, nutritious soup that can be served hot or cold, purée boiled carrots and potatoes in a blender or food processor, and add herbs and spices to taste.
  • Spiced carrot sticks are a flavorful variation on an old favorite at parties or at the dinner table. Soak carrot sticks in hot water spiced with cayenne, coriander seeds and salt. Allow to cool, drain and serve.
6

Celery

Celery

Celery is a rich source of phenolic phytonutrients that have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. These phytonutrients include: caffeic acid, caffeoylquinic acid, cinnamic acid, coumaric acid, ferulic acid, apigenin, luteolin, quercetin, kaempferol, lunularin, beta-sitosterol and furanocoumarins. Celery is an excellent source of vitamin K and molybdenum. It is a very good source of folate, potassium, dietary fiber, manganese, and pantothenic acid. Celery is also a good source of vitamin B2, copper, vitamin C, vitamin B6, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and vitamin A (in the form of carotenoids).

Quick Tips

  • Add chopped celery to your favorite tuna fish or chicken salad recipe.
  • Enjoy the delicious tradition of eating peanut butter on celery stalks.
  • Use celery leaves in salads.
  • Braise chopped celery, radicchio and onions and serve topped with walnuts and your favorite soft cheese.
  • Next time you are making fresh squeezed carrot juice give it a unique taste dimension by adding some celery to it.
  • Add celery leaves and sliced celery stalks to soups, stews, casseroles, and Healthy Stir-Fries.
  • Consider the purchase of celery in its non-Pascal varieties. Root celery can be served as a major plate vegetable all its own, and leaf celery can be substituted for parsley in almost any recipe.
7

Cucumbers

Cucumbers

Cucumbers provide us with a variety of health-supportive phytonutrients. Included among these phytonutrients are flavonoids (apigenin, luteolin, quercetin, and kaempferol), lignans (pinoresinol, lariciresinol, and secoisolariciresinol), and triterpenes (cucurbitacins A, B, C, and D).

Cucumbers are an excellent source of vitamin K and molybdenum. They are also a very good source of the pantothenic acid. They are also a good source of copper, potassium, manganese, vitamin C, phosphorus, magnesium, biotin, and vitamin B1. They also contain the important nail health-promoting mineral silica.

Quick Tips

  • Use half-inch thick cucumber slices as petite serving "dishes" for chopped vegetable salads.
  • Mix diced cucumbers with sugar snap peas and mint leaves and toss with rice wine vinaigrette.
  • For refreshing cold gazpacho soup that takes five minutes or less to make, simply purée cucumbers, tomatoes, green peppers and onions, then add salt and pepper to taste.
  • Add diced cucumber to tuna fish or chicken salad recipes.
9

Olives

Olives

Olives are a remarkable source of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory phytonutrients. Most prominent are two simple phenols (tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol) and several terpenes (especially oleuropein, erythrodiol, uvaol, oleanolic acid, elenoic acid and ligstroside). Flavonoids—including apigenin, luteolin, cyanidins, and peonidins)—are typically provided in valuable amounts by lives, as are hydroxycinnamic acids like caffeic acid, cinnamic acid, ferulic acid, and coumaric acid. The phytonutrient content of olives depends upon olive variety, stage of maturation, and post-harvest treatment. Olives are a very good source of copper amd a good source of iron, dietary fiber, and vitamin E.

Quick Tips

  • Olive tapenade is a delicious and easy-to-make spread that you can use as a dip, sandwich spread, or topping for fish and poultry. To make it, put pitted olives in a food processor with olive oil, garlic, and your favorite seasonings.
  • Toss pasta with chopped olives, tomatoes, garlic, olive oil and fresh herbs of your choice.
  • Marinate olives in olive oil, lemon zest, coriander seeds and cumin seeds.
  • Add chopped olives to your favorite tuna or chicken salad recipe.
  • Set out a small plate of olives on the dinner table along with some vegetable crudités for your family to enjoy with the meal.
3

Cabbage

Cabbage

Cabbage can be eaten raw, steamed, boiled, roasted, sautéed or stuffed. The sulfurous odor often associated with cabbage only develops when the cabbage is overcooked. The longer a cabbage is cooked, the stronger the odor becomes. Cabbage is an excellent source of vitamin K, vitamin C, and vitamin B6. It is also a very good source of manganese, dietary fiber, potassium, vitamin B1, folate and copper. Additionally, cabbage is a good source of choline, phosphorus, vitamin B2, magnesium, calcium, selenium, iron, pantothenic acid, protein, and niacin.

Quick Tips

  • To cut cabbage into smaller pieces, first quarter it and remove the core. Cabbage can be cut into slices of varying thickness, grated by hand or shredded in a food processor.
  • Add shredded cabbage to any salad or fresh coleslaw.
  • Try raw shredded cabbage dressed in olive oil, vinegar, and a little salt for a simple yet tasty salad.
  • Slice cabbage into thin wedges then season with your favorite seasonings and pop in them into the over for a tasty crisp snack.
5

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

Cauliflower is an excellent source of vitamin C, vitamin K, folate, pantothenic acid, and vitamin B6. It is a very good source of choline, dietary fiber, omega-3 fatty acids, manganese, phosphorus, and biotin. Additionally, it is a good source of vitamin B2, protein, vitamin B1, niacin, and magnesium.

Quick Tips

  • Puree cooked cauliflower, add fennel seeds and your other favorite herbs and spices and serve as soup.
  • Because of its shape and taste, cauliflower florets make wonderful crudite for dipping in sauces.
8

Kale

Kale

Kale is a nutritional standout in three basic areas: (1) antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrients, (2) much-needed micronutrients (in which the average U.S. adult is currently deficient), and (3) cancer-preventive nutrients called glucosinolates.

Quick Tips

  • Braise chopped kale and apples. Before serving, sprinkle with balsamic vinegar and chopped walnuts.
  • Combine chopped kale, pine nuts, and feta cheese with whole grain pasta drizzled with olive oil.