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Headline for SENSATIONAL WORDS TO SHARE: A COLLABORATIVE GLOSSARY
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SENSATIONAL WORDS TO SHARE: A COLLABORATIVE GLOSSARY

Words are power! Please add cool words that you've discovered to this glossary. Simply scroll down to the bottom header that says "Add to List" and select the "Text" button on the far left.
1. List the word. (Make sure it hasn't already been listed: no duplicates!) Next to it, in parentheses, note part(s) of speech
2. Include a relevant image to make the word memorable
3. In the description text box, indicate the pronunciation of the word and at least one dictionary definition. Attribute your source.

You can receive an extra credit point for every accurate, complete entry you submit. However, you must email Mrs. Cowell with a numbered listing of the entries you added; her emailed confirmation is your verification.

1

amicable (adj.)

amicable (adj.)

Pronunciation:
/ˈæmɪkəb(ə)l/
Etymology: < Latin amīcābil-is (a word of Roman law), < amīc-us friend, connected with amā-re to love. The earlier form was amiable adj. through Old French; compare appliable, which preceded applicable.(Show Less)
1. Friendly.
2. esp. Of mutual arrangements: Done in a friendly spirit, with mutual goodwill, or without quarrelling or employment of force; peaceable, harmonious. E.g., an amicable divorce is one where the two formerly married partners split on good terms, without fighting.
3. Of things: Kindly, benign, genial. Obs.

Pronunciation and definition courtesy of the Oxford English Dictionary Online.

2

apotheosis (n.)

apotheosis (n.)

Pronunciation: Brit. /əˌpɒθɪˈəʊsɪs/ , U.S. /əˌpɑθiˈoʊsəs/
Etymology: < post-classical Latin apotheosis deification (late 2nd cent. in Tertullian), ascent to heaven of a saint (a1508) < Hellenistic Greek ἀποθέωσις deification < ἀποθεοῦν to deify ( < ancient Greek ἀπο- apo- prefix + θεοῦν to make a god of < θεός god: see theo- comb. form) + -σις -sis suffix.

  1. The action, process, or fact of ranking, or of being ranked, among the gods; transformation into a god, deification; elevation to divine status. Also: an instance of this. 2a. Glorification or exaltation of a principle, practice, etc. Also: an instance of this; a glorified ideal. 2b. Attribution of more or less divine power or virtue to a person; glorification or exaltation of a person. Also: an instance of this.
  2. The best or most highly developed example of something; the highest point or culmination, the acme.

All definitions courtesy of the Oxford English Dictionary Online.

3

inconsolable (adj)

inconsolable (adj)

/ɪnkənˈsəʊləb(ə)l/
1. cannot be alleviated or comforted

Oxford American Dictionary

4

euphemism (n)

euphemism (n)

/ˈjuːfɪmɪz(ə)m/
1. a word or phrase substituted for something for something thats usually embarrassing or unpleasant
2. making something bad sound good

Oxford English Dictionary

4

anathema (n.)

anathema (n.)

Pronunciation
/əˈnæθɪmə/
Etymology: < Latin anathema an excommunicated person, also the curse of excommunication, < Greek ἀνάθεμα , originally ‘a thing devoted,’ but in later usage ‘a thing devoted to evil, an accursed thing’ (see Rom. ix. 3). Originally a variant of ἀνάθημα an offering, a thing set up (to the gods), n. of product < ἀνατιθέναι to set up, < ἀνά up + τιθέναι (stem θε- ) to place. Compare anathem n., and anatheme n.(Show Less)

  1. A curse or imprecation generally
  2. Anything accursed, or consigned to damnation.

Source: Oxford English Dictionary
http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/7144?redirectedFrom=anathema&
Photo Credit: http://www.clipartpal.com/_thumbs/pd/holiday/halloween/witch_using_wand.png

4

arcane (adj.)

arcane (adj.)

Pronunciation
/ɑːˈkeɪn/
Etymology: < Latin arcānus, < arcēre to shut up, arca chest; compare French arcane.

  1. Hidden, concealed, secret.

Source: Oxford English Dictionary
http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/10258?redirectedFrom=arcane#eid
Photo Credit: https://img1.etsystatic.com/049/0/9952782/il_fullxfull.709715689_s73g.jpg

4

flagrant (adj,)

flagrant (adj,)

Pronunciation
\ˈflā-grənt also ˈfla-\

1.conspicuously offensive ; especially : so obviously inconsistent with what is right or proper as to appear to be a flouting of law or morality

Source: Merriam-Webster Dictionary
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/flagrant
Photo Credit: http://media.salon.com/2013/08/shutterstock_96583111.jpg

5

benign (adj.)

benign (adj.)

Pronunciation:
bəˈnīn/
Etymology: Early 14c., from Old French benigne (12c., "kind, benign, merciful, gracious;" Modern French bénin, fem. bénigne), from Latin benignus "kindly, kindhearted, friendly, generous," literally "well born," from bene "well".
Definition:
1. Gentle; kindly:
Her face was calm and benign
2. (Of a climate or environment) mild and favorable.
Jersey's benign climate and free-draining sandy soil provide the ideal environment for over 80 species of lavender.
3.Not harmful to the environment:
An ozone-benign refrigerant
4.Medicine (Of a disease) not harmful in effect: in particular, (of a tumor) not malignant.
In actual fact, for the vast majority of cases, the childhood infectious diseases are benign and self-limiting.

OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARIES

5

serendipitous (adj.)

serendipitous (adj.)

Pronunciation: /ˌserənˈdipədəs/
Etymology: 1754, coined by Horace Walpole (1717-92) in a letter to Horace Mann (dated Jan. 28); he said he formed it from the Persian fairy tale "The Three Princes of Serendip," whose heroes "were always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things they were not in quest of." The name is from Serendip, an old name for Ceylon (modern Sri Lanka), from Arabic Sarandib, from Sanskrit Simhaladvipa "Dwelling-Place-of-Lions Island."
Definition:
Occurring or discovered by chance in a happy or beneficial way:
Example:

  • A serendipitous encounter -And this was totally serendipitous, unexpected, it just came out as we started writing this material up about a year ago.

OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARIES

6

gird (v.t.)

gird (v.t.)

Pronunciation
/ɡɜːd/

Etymology: Of obscure origin.

  1. To strike, smite. Often with adv. compl. describing the effect of the stroke

Source: Oxford English Dictionary
http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/78457?result=4&rskey=mmojov&
Photo Credit: http://images.clipartpanda.com/hitting-clipart-nTX8oXnyc.gif

6

kilt (v.t.)

kilt (v.t.)

Pronunciation
/kɪlt/

Etymology: apparently of Scandinavian origin: compare Danish kilte (also kilte op) to tuck up, Swedish (dialect) kilta to swathe, swaddle; Old Norse had kilting, kjalta skirt, lap.

  1. To gird up; to tuck up (the skirts) round the body. Also with up.

Source: Oxford English Dictionary
http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/103412?result=2&rskey=h62tzv&
Photo: http://cdn4.mcspr.net/media/sitegraphics/cms-kilt-pleating-box-pleats.jpg.pagespeed.ce.-2XY7jOYOg.jpg

6

nexus (n.)

nexus (n.)

Pronunciation
/ˈnɛksəs/

Etymology: < classical Latin nexus (plural nexūs ) the action of binding, a bond, tie, a type of legal obligation, a combination, connected group < nectere to bind, connect (see net n.1) + -tus, suffix forming verbal nouns.

  1. A bond, link, or junction; a means of connection between things or parts; (also) the state of being connected or linked.

Source: Oxford Online Dictionary
http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/126677?redirectedFrom=Nexus#eid
Photo Credit: https://d30y9cdsu7xlg0.cloudfront.net/png/195982-200.png

6

vehemently (adv.)

vehemently (adv.)

Pronunciation:

/ˈviːɪməntlɪ/

Etymology: < vehement adj.

  1. With strong or violent language; in a manner showing strong feeling or excitement.

Source: Oxford English Dictionary
http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/221901?redirectedFrom=Vehemently#eid
Photo Credit: http://listcrux.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/The-intense-feeling-love-may-path-way-to-another-equally-intense-feeling-hatred.jpeg

7

superfluous (adj.)

superfluous (adj.)

Pronunciation
/suˈpərfləwəs/

Etymology: < classical Latin superfluus superflue adj. + -ous suffix. Compare earlier superflue adj. and the Romance forms cited at that entry; compare also superfluent adj. With the use as noun, compare earlier superflue n., superfluity n.
Compare the following earlier occurrence of the Latin adjective in a Middle English context, in the specific mathematical sense ‘(of a number) that is smaller than the sum of its factors’:

  1. That is present in a greater quantity than is desired, permitted, or required for the purpose; abundant or numerous to the point of excess; more than sufficient.

Source: Oxford English Dictionary
http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/194328?redirectedFrom=superfluous#eid
Photo Credit: https://img0.etsystatic.com/000/0/5157460/il_570xN.254942972.jpg

7

venerable (adj.)

venerable (adj.)

Pronunciation:

/ˈvɛnərəb(ə)l/

Etymology: < Old French venerable (modern French vénérable, = Spanish venerable, Portuguese veneravel, Italian venerabile) or < Latin venerābilis, < venerārī to venerate

  1. Of persons: Worthy of being venerated, revered, or highly respected and esteemed, on account of character or position:

Source: Oxford English Dictionary
http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/222102?redirectedFrom=venerable#eid
Photo Credit: http://www.catholic-ew.org.uk/var/storage/images/catholic-news/catholic-news-media-library/images/venerable-english-college/vec-papal-audience/230716-1-eng-GB/VEC-Papal-Audience.jpg

8

vermillion (n.)

vermillion (n.)

Pronunciation: /vəˈmɪljən/
Etymology: < Anglo-Norman and Old French vermeillon, vermillon, vermilo(u)n, etc. (modern French vermillon , = Provençal vermeillon , vermillon , vermelho , Catalan bermello , Spanish bermellon , bermillon , vermellon , Portuguese vermelhaõ , Italian vermiglione ), < vermeil vermeil adj. Hence also Dutch vermiljoen, Danish and Swedish vermilion.
With the forms vermeon, vermion compare medieval Latin vermeum, variant of vermellum, etc. With the form vermiglion compare Italian vermiglione.
Definition: Cinnabar or red crystalline mercuric sulphide, esp. in later use that obtained artificially, much valued on account of its brilliant scarlet colour, and largely used as a pigment or in the manufacture of red sealing-wax; also, any red earth resembling this and similarly used as a pigment.

Pronunciation and definition courtesy of the Oxford English Dictionary Online.

8

tenacious (adj.)

tenacious (adj.)

Pronunciation: /tɪˈneɪʃəs/
Etymology: < Latin tenāx, tenāci- holding fast ( < tenēre to hold) + -ous suffix: see -acious suffix
Definition: Holding together, cohesive; tough; not easily pulled in pieces or broken.

Pronunciation and definition courtesy of the Oxford English Dictionary Online.

Picture from: http://media.tumblr.com/70a82c6d31025e0bcb990c304ad963ba/tumblr_inline_mpq8xec8mc1qz4rgp.jpg

9

ersatz (adj.)

ersatz (adj.)

Pronunciation: Brit. /ˈəːsats/ , /ˈɛːsats/ , /ˈəːzats/ , /ˈɛːzats/ , U.S. ersatz#_us_1_rr.mp3 /ˈɛrˌsɑts/ , /ˈɛrˌzæts/ , ersatz#_us_2_rr.mp3 /ˈɛrˌzɑts/
Etymology: German, = compensation, replacement.
Thesaurus »

A substitute or imitation (usually, an inferior article instead of the real thing).

Hawaii's warm tropical climate makes actual fireplaces impractical, so during the holidays, winter-wishful locals often resort to creating ersatz construction-paper hearths, complete with faux blazing Yule fires.

Definition courtesy Oxford English Dictionary Online

10

sanguine (adj.)

sanguine (adj.)

Pronunciation:
/ˈsaNGɡwən/
Etymology: Meaning "cheerful, hopeful, confident" first attested c. 1500, because these qualities were thought in medieval physiology to spring from an excess of blood as one of the four humors. Also in Middle English as a noun, "type of red cloth" (early 14c.).
1. Optimistic or positive, especially in an apparently bad or difficult situation:
2. (In medieval science and medicine) of or having the constitution associated with the predominance of blood among the bodily humors, supposedly marked by a ruddy complexion and an optimistic disposition.
3. A blood-red color.

Source Oxford English Dictionary Online.

11

cacophony (n.)

cacophony (n.)

Pronunciation:
/kəˈkäfənē/
Etymology: Mid 17th century: from French cacophonie, from Greek kakophōnia, from kakophōnos 'ill-sounding', from kakos 'bad' + phōnē 'sound'.

  1. A harsh, discordant mixture of sounds.

Source Oxford English Dictionary Online

11

ebullient (adj.)

ebullient (adj.)

Pronunciation:
/iˈbo͝olyənt/ /iˈbəlyənt/
Etymology: Late 16th century (in the sense 'boiling'): from Latin ebullient- 'boiling up', from the verb ebullire, from e- (variant of ex-) 'out' + bullire 'to boil'.

  1. Cheerful and full of energy.
  2. (Of liquid or matter) boiling or agitated as if boiling.

Source: Oxford English Dictionary Online.

11

fetid (adj.)

fetid (adj.)

Pronunciation:
/ˈfedid/
Etymology: < Late Middle English: from Latin fetidus (often erroneously spelled foetidus), from fetere 'to stink'. Compare with fetor.

  1. Smelling extremely unpleasant.

Source: Oxford English Dictionary Online.

11

grandiloquent (adj.)

grandiloquent (adj.)

Pronunciation:
/ɡranˈdiləkwənt/
Etymology: Late 16th century: from Latin grandiloquus, literally 'grand-speaking', from grandis 'grand' + loqui 'speak'. The ending was altered in English by association with eloquent.

  1. Pompous or extravagant in language, style, or manner, especially in a way that is intended to impress

Source Oxford English Dictionary Online

11

impinge (verb)

impinge (verb)

Pronunciation:
/imˈpinj/
Etymology: Mid 16th century: from Latin impingere 'drive something in or at', from in- 'into' + pangere 'fix, drive'. The word originally meant 'thrust at forcibly', then 'come into forcible contact'; hence 'encroach on' (mid 18th century).

  1. Have an effect or impact, especially a negative on.
  2. Advance over an area belonging to someone or something else.
  3. Strike Source Oxford English Dictionary Online
11

languid (adj.)

languid (adj.)

Pronunciation:
/ˈlaNGɡwəd/
Etymology: Late 16th century (sense 2): from French languide or Latin languidus, from languere

  1. Of a person, manner, or gesture) displaying or having a disinclination for physical exertion or effort; slow and relaxed.
  2. Of an occasion or period of time) pleasantly lazy and peaceful.
  3. Weak or faint from illness or fatigue.

Source Oxford English Dictionary Online.