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Updated by Samantha Montano on Sep 02, 2015
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New Orleans Related

News articles related to New Orleans, LA. Most focus on Katrina and the destruction of the levee system including long-term recovery issues. May also include issues of culture, race, gentrification, economy, preparedness, and mitigation for New Orleans/ Southeast Louisiana. (See separate list for BP Oil Disaster and Oil Related List for some Louisiana articles.)
Destroy and Rebuild: A Q&A With One of New Orleans' Biggest Developers
New Orleans is transforming. The city's poorly constructed levees meant that when Hurricane Katrina hit in 2005, it devastated the city, bringing in floodwaters that forced out residents and flattened neighborhoods. It also created an opportunity for developers and politicians to remake it anew.
Fuck you you fucking fucks. I don't give a damn what the hell you Yankees/Texans do, do it in your own yard, and shut the fuck up. We don't care what you do, and we don't want your damned PVC sided beige square houses uglying up our town.
Alexander Allison Photograph Collection
In 1953, Mr. Allison donated 323 4x5 prints of his work to the Library. Following his death in 1964, Mr. Allison's daughter gave additional prints and his entire collection of negatives to the Louisiana Division.
What We Learned from Isaac, Katrina, Rita...
Few regional societies have gained a more rigorous - if unwilling - place-based education in recent years than the inhabitants of greater New Orleans and the Louisiana coast. The past two decades have imparted, to nearly two million people, advanced lessons in geography, hydrology, climatology, engineering, civics, disaster recovery, sociology and urban planning.
Study bust myth that New Orleans is sunken city
By Leslie Williams Staff writer A yearlong topographic and demographic study of New Orleans arrives this month like the latest installment of the television series "MythBusters" -- and may forever change the notion of the Big Easy as a below-sea-level city.
Myth Busters by Levees.org
The top commander of the Army Corps of Engineers recently admitted he relied on things he had heard but not personally researched when he told the New York Times that New Orleans officials are partly to blame for the Katrina flooding.
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As a Native American, my belief is that when the place where I live sinks under the sea, the Houma Nation, my tribe, ceases to exist. - Steve Cheramie, 1999 WHAT IS CAUSING COASTAL EROSION IN LOUISIANA? One would hope that if the cause of Louisiana's coastal wetland loss is simple, the solution might also be simple.
Corps to strengthen substandard segment of New Orleans lakefront levee with sheet piling
The Army Corps of Engineers will strengthen a segment of rebuilt earthen levee that stretches along Lake Pontchartrain from Franklin Avenue to the west bank of the Industrial Canal after engineers found that post-Katrina levee improvements were inadequate.
Ray Nagin Charges Compound a Broken Legacy of Post-Katrina Leadership
Former mayor of New Orleans Ray Nagin is well-known for his controversial efforts to rebuild his city after it was devastated by Hurricane Katrina in 2005.
The Big Comeback: Is New Orleans America's Next Great Innovation Hub?
In the wrinkled edifices of the French Quarter and the worn-out storefront walls along Canal Street, a legacy of decay in New Orleans intrudes on the mossy city. It is a sense of things that have nearly fallen apart and stayed nearly-fallen-apart for decades.
Katrina Red Tape Keeps New Orleans Homeowner in Limbo
NEW ORLEANS - Errol Joseph has the doorknobs. He has the doors, too, as well as a bathtub and a couple of sinks, stacks of drywall, a hot water heater, pipes, an air-conditioner compressor, and big pink rolls of insulation. They are sitting in a shed.
New research: Louisiana coast faces highest rate of sea-level rise worldwide
Stunning new data not yet publicly released shows Louisiana losing its battle with rising seas much more quickly than even the most pessimistic studies have predicted to date. While state officials continue to argue over restoration projects to save the state's sinking, crumbling coast, top researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have concluded that Louisiana is in line for the highest rate of sea-level rise "on the planet."
Louisiana's 2012 Coastal Master Plan.
Louisiana's 2012 Coastal Master Plan, developed by the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority, breaks new ground in important ways. It uses science to examine our options so we improve how we make decisions. It will also be the first of Louisiana's coastal plans to lay out a specific plan of action.
History of Marlyville-Fontainebleau
New Orleans in the late 1800s was a poorly-drained, under-developed city in which a notoriously inhospitable climate, inadequate sanitation, scarce habitable land, seasonal flooding and widespread disease all conspired to thwart expansion. Despite having been ranked as America's third-largest city in 1840 , New Orleans' thereafter remained lackluster, while more vibrant urban and industrial cities like Philadelphia, Boston and Cincinnati forged ahead.
NOLA Master Street List - DRAFT | Data.NOLA.gov | Enabling New Orleans
This lists replaces the previous version of the New Orleans street name file. It is a work-in-progress and will be updated as needed. This version updates column names and corrects spellings of several streets. It represents an inventory of official street name spellings in the City of New Orleans.
New Orleans Past
To order prints of images in our websites, please visit The Nostalgic New Orleans Collection Shop .
New Orleans Still Quietly Healing As Super Bowl Comes To Town
NEW ORLEANS (AP) - New Orleans has celebrated plenty of milestones on its slow road to recovery from Hurricane Katrina, but arguably none is bigger than hosting its first Super Bowl since the 2005 storm left the city in shambles.
Streets Department Photographs, City Archives, New Orleans Public Library
The photographs were scanned in greyscale mode at a resolution of 400-600 ppi and saved in TIFF format. The TIFF images were edited to produce greyscale JPEG images of 650 pixel width (or height) for web display. The JPEG images were again edited to produce 150 pixel width (or height) thumbnail images, also for web display.
WPA Photograph Collection Louisiana Division New Orleans Public Library Date range: 1936-1942 Size of collection:7000 negatives (4" x 5"); 3 ft. prints (8" x 10") Source: Unknown Terms of Access: Available to registered researchers by appointment Copyright Information: Please discuss with an archivist in the Louisiana Division.
What You Won't Read About New Orleans
The sheer amount of renditions of "Do You Know What it Means to Miss New Orleans?" never ceases to amaze me. My personal favorite is Satchmo's raspy live version, but the Preservation Hall Jazz Band's somber version will break your heart. Billie Holliday, Harry Connick, Jr.
Suing oil and gas interests to save the coast: author John Barry weighs in
The Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East has filed a controversial lawsuit seeking to extract a settlement from oil, gas and pipeline interests in compensation for the industry's long-term damage to Louisiana's fragile and rapidly collapsing coast. The administration of Gov.
ILIT DOWNLOAD CENTER (sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation)
Flood Protection Systems in Hurricane Katrina on
Living With Water
How can we live with water in the coming decades? The professional team is developing a vision for a safer and more beautiful Greater New Orleans, one that is built upon sustainable water management principles and best practices. New Orleanians, having inhabited the delta for centuries, can once again embrace water to achieve improved safety, economic growth, and quality of life.
Facing Fire Over Challenge to Louisiana's Oil Industry
BATON ROUGE, La. - State Senator Gerald Long of Louisiana calls it "kind of a gentlemen's agreement." For the generations since Mr. Long's third cousin Huey P. Long was the governor, this state has relied on the oil and gas industry for a considerable part of its revenues and for tens of thousands of jobs.