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Updated by Heidi Veal on Mar 11, 2017
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Heidi Veal Heidi Veal
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Differentiated Instruction

Here’s a list of blogs, resources, and information all about Differentiated Instruction.

Diane Ravitch defines differentiating instruction as a form of instruction that seeks to "maximize each student's growth by recognizing that students have different ways of learning, different interests, and different ways of responding to instruction."

Differentiated Instruction on readingrockets.org

Differentiated Instruction is a flexible and individual approach to instruction based on students’ specific instructional needs. ReadingRockets.org focuses on Differentiated Instruction as it relates to reading development.

Differentiating Instruction: Meeting Students Where They Are, Teaching Today, Glencoe Online

Differentiating Instruction: Meeting Students Where They Are No two students enter a classroom with identical abilities, experiences, and needs. Learning style, language proficiency, background knowledge, readiness to learn, and other factors can vary widely within a single class group. Regardless of their individual differences, however, students are expected to master the same concepts, principles, and skills.

Differentiated Instruction for Reading

What Is differentiated instruction?Differentiated instruction, also called differentiation, is a process through which teachers enhance learning by matching student characteristics to instruction and assessment. Differentiated instruction allows all students to access the same classroom curriculum by providing entry points, learning tasks, and outcomes that are tailored to students' needs (Hall, Strangman, & Meyer, 2003).

Differentiated Instruction for Writing

What is differentiated instruction?Differentiated instruction, also called differentiation, is a process through which teachers enhance learning by matching student characteristics to instruction and assessment. Differentiated instruction allows all students to access the same classroom curriculum by providing entry points, learning tasks, and outcomes that are tailored to students' needs (Hall, Strangman, & Meyer, 2003).

What Makes Differentiated Instruction Successful?

A simple answer is that students in the elementary grades vary greatly, and if teachers want to maximize their students' individual potential, they will have to attend to the differences.

Grouping Students Who Struggle With Reading

In this article, we provide an overview of the recent research on grouping practices (whole class, small group, pairs, one-on-one) during reading instruction for students with disabilities. We also provide suggestions on how teachers can apply this research in the classroom.

All Differentiated Instruction articles

Plethora of articles on ReadingRockets.org related to Differentiated Instruction, many of which relate to students with unique learning needs.

What Is Differentiated Instruction? | Scholastic.com

Here are some seminal books on differentiation. Set aside time to reflect on the ideas in these texts, and then discuss what you've learned with colleagues. Continually ask, How can this information support change in my teaching practices? This question will start your differentiation journey.

Differentiated Instruction

Three videos highlight how Differentiated Instruction is implemented in three different settings, with both students and professional educators.

Educational Leadership: What Research Says About Differentiated Learning

This article provides an overview of what research says about Differentiated Instruction and what we can do with that knowledge to impact classroom practices.

4 Proven Strategies for Differentiating Instruction | Scholastic.com

Article 4 Proven Strategies for Differentiating Instruction Helping Each Child learn Within the Elementary Classroom By now, we're all familiar with the fact that we need to differentiate instruction, but actually being able to meet the specific needs of each students can be a challenge.

Do Visual, Auditory, and Kinesthetic Learners Need Visual, Auditory, and Kinesthetic Instruction?

Discussions of visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learners1 are common in educational literature, teacher-preparation programs, and professional development workshops. The theory that students learn more when content is presented in their best modality seems to make sense, seems to be supported by classroom experiences, and offers the hope of maximizing each child's learning by planning different lessons for each type of learner.

Differentiating Instruction in the Preschool-Early Childhood Setting

Differentiating Instruction in the Preschool Classroom: Bridging Emergent Literacy Instruction and Developmentally Appropriate Practice
By Consulting Author Terri Purcell, Ph.D.