List Headline Image
Updated by Christopher Gerben on Feb 18, 2018
Headline for Good examples of corporate voice
 REPORT
50 items   6 followers   56 votes   233 views

Good examples of corporate voice

Class examples of strong and consistent corporate voice. Examples can include anything: print/visual ads, YouTube videos, social media campaigns, etc.

Apple - Here's to the Crazy Ones (1997)

This spot was released to initiate the Think Different campaign in 1997. Here's to the reasons we stick with Apple through the ups and downs.

One of the best appeals I have ever seen, especially considering its brevity. I know that as an example of corporate voice it is a bit older, but in 1997 I don't think that Apple Inc. could have come up with a better commercial - Marco

40

Geico TV Commercials

Geico TV Commercials

For years, TV audiences can always have a giggle thanks to Geico Insurance and it's hilarious commercials. Whether it's the cavemen, the gecko, Maxwell the Pig, or the "It's What You Do" campaign, Geico creates commercials about insurance that people want to watch. The voice that comes through in these commercials is light and doesn't take itself too seriously, shattering the stereotype of insurance brokers as stuffed shirts, dry and boring.

New Amazon Prime Commercial 2016 – A Priest and Imam meet for a cup of tea.

Amazon struck big with this commercial that took advantage of both the vulnerabilities of the current political climate and general holiday merriment. Yes, there is an Amazon purchase made in the commercial, but the focus is not on the purchase, but more around the connection that it helps foster. It is elevating a pretty low-commitment purchase into one that really means something. Viewers leave feeling touched, and with Amazon on their minds. It shows how Amazon purchases can really enhance your life, and your relationships. -SPS

Home | Dunkin' Donuts

Dunkin' Donuts is America's favorite every day, all-day stop for coffee and baked goods. Dunkin' Donuts is a market leader in the regular/decaf coffee, iced coffee, hot flavored coffee, donut, bagel and muffin categories, and the world's leading baked goods and coffee chain in the world.

10

Burn

Burn

The first time I saw one of the commercials for this ad campaign (there is at least one more), I thought it was ridiculous and slightly crude. However, they effectively communicate that Planet Fitness is not trying to take itself too seriously and by extension, patrons of the gym, do not have to take themselves too seriously, either.

42

Getting Your Freak On

Getting Your Freak On

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/540727a5e4b05f700aaed368/56a0fe2905f8e2d19bfded8e/56a14660d82d5efbf1a7e32f/1453409898346/Casper.NYSubway_Freak_On.jpg
Casper, an online mattress company, has multiple iterations of ads on the NYC subway like this one, but with different texts and images. (I'm really into this one though.) They're all clever cartoons, and they're all amusing to an audience of bored commuters. Casper's marketing personnel are great at upholding a specific company "voice" through words and imagery, and in doing so have established a recognizable brand. I dig it.

12

Taco Bell's Twitter

Taco Bell's Twitter

Number 7 on the list...The home Twitter page is also really amazing. It's a very relaxed, carefree kind of presence and seems as if it appeals to a teen/young adult audience than anything.

https://twitter.com/TacoBell

5

Wendy's on Facebook

Wendy's on Facebook

While I'm currently ending my relationship with fast food, Wendy's is still a favorite. Whoever works in their social media marketing department is great with one-liners and short phrases that appeal to a younger crowd, or a hip, 30-something mother of one who still partakes in value menu meals on Friday nights. One of my favorite recent posts from the Wendy's Facebook page featured a picture of some of the value menu options with a vanilla Frosty and the phrase: "All this with a little extra skrilla for vanilla." The writer finds creative ways to promote the value menu without ever saying the words "value menu."

Criterion Collection (@Criterion) | Twitter
Here's a link to Criterion Collection's twitter. Criterion's focus is presenting what it (rightfully, IMHO) sees as the greatest films of all time. Their twitter account sends out links to news, posts images from classic scenes, and invites followers to respond to questions about favorite films and their love of movies in general.
M&M'S® Brand (@mmschocolate) | Twitter
I like the M&M's commercials and twitter feed. Is it the best and most clever writing we've ever seen? No, but as a brand voice they're very consistent. It's silly and cute, like candy ought to be, and I'm just excited to hear Billy West and JK Simmons on a regular basis!
17

Apple Web Copy

Throughout Apple's corporate website, the copy is slick, smart and hilarious. Apple understands the internet audience: they are not going to read 19 paragraphs about the iPod, or any of their products. So how do you reduce the product into a few lines? Here's an example from the iPod page: "engineered for maximum funness: there's thin and light. Then there's thin and light on a whole other level.: Check out their other pages too. It is a great lesson on how to write effective, informative and persuasive web copy and how to invent a fun, warm, and connective corporate voice - that doesn't sound like a Corporate Voice.
How leaders can enable employees to voice more and quit less

Interested in hearing genuine suggestions from subordinates? Want to reduce their turnover? Actually you can achieve both together by learning to become an ethical leader. In a recent study, my co-authors and I studied whether supervisory ethical leadership can engage employees more on their jobs, and in turn, influence the likelihood that they will speak up more and stay longer in organizations.

Dear Women of the Future

This Rent the Runway video doesn't just feature one corporate voice; it shows messages from a variety of women to promote its values and its brand. The video's consistent with the brand's messaging of celebrating life as women -- whatever that may mean to its audience.

Instagram post by Ina Garten • Feb 13, 2017 at 7:18pm UTC

Ina Garten, the Barefoot Contessa herself, has long-maintained an open and easygoing style and voice that is consistent across platforms, from her cookbooks to her television series and now on Instagram. The Barefoot Contessa voice is informative, but never didactic. As the face of the brand, Ina connects with readers and viewers by sharing personal stories and simple, easy to follow instructions, often offering alternatives to complicated recipes or difficult-to-find ingredients. The overhead cooking demonstration craze exploded in 2016, with everyone getting in on the game. Ina adopts the strategy, but maintains her own voice by demonstrating with a classic, easy-to-assemble recipe. Although she doesn't speak in the video, the corporate voice is communicated in the way the recipe is demonstrated: the ingredients are easy to identify and the instructions are easy to follow. Like most of the Barefoot Contessa recipes, the video juxtaposes elegance and convenience without any pretension. To round it all out, Ina includes one of her playful, signature rhetorical questions: "What could be better...?"

There's More Out There...Your Lunch Says it All

So, on a slightly more serious note, Wendy's new spokesperson is associated with a series of good commercials, all of which effectively make you question the quality of the garbage you usually eat in fast food restaurants.

Home Furnishings, Home Decor, Outdoor Furniture & Modern Furniture | Pottery Barn

One of my favorite stores. Their corporate voice is displayed in their products and they market casual elegant. Their webpage and magazines contain pictures and text that creates a sense of hominess and coziness. It appeals to a sense of relaxation and comfort.

Visa Olympics Commercial Sarah Hendrickson "Flying"

I wanted to add one more - the VISA commercials are fantastic examples of a strong and consistent corporate voice. Their commercials during the Olympics have been epic.

25

Pantene - Not Sorry

Here is a commercial from Pantene about the way women so often feel the need to apologize. Most of us have seen it before, but it's worth seeing again.

Taste the Feeling: Watch 6 Ads From Coke's New Global Campaign

See the first six TV commercials from 'Taste the Feeling'.

I don't drink soda, but I think Coca-cola has always had a great advertising campaign and a strong, compelling, organizational voice. They are masters of emotional appeals (pathos).

SPCA Commercial "somewhere in america"

This video is not owned by me, modified for a school project. All credit goes to rightful owners.

Misty Copeland's New Under Armour Ad Will Hypnotize You

Under Armour's ad campaigns are striking an inspiring tone and have been consistent in their brand communications to their potential customer base.

Bernie Sanders

The official campaign website for the presidential campaign of United States Senator Bernie Sanders. This, and many political websites, are typically good examples of the corporate voice of the candidate.

ChipotleVerified account

Chipotle "bowls over" the competition when it comes to dishing out clever and humurous tweets to its long list of followers. Whether you're looking for a hearty chuckle or simply in need of some drool-worthy photos fiesta style, add Chipotle to your Twitter feed. It'll certainly spice things up!

Introducing Microsoft Surface Studio

Microsoft's newest Surface Studio commercial is beautiful. It shows their commitment to innovation (moving parts, colors exploding) , and dynamic approach to technology. Their website is written in a similar voice, using appeals in the 2nd person, "Just like you," and even rhetorical questions, "Who has time for that anymore?" This voice is personable and creative. I think it's an effective sales tool because it is excitable and appears to have an opinion.

MARK OF THE BEAST (@marksofthebeast) • Instagram photos and videos

Here is an interesting example of turning corporate voices on their heads. This account uses familiar brand labels to make marked statements about capitalism and consumerism. It appropriates these images effectively so that the account develops its own voice. -SPS