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Updated by kathline-gomes on Apr 24, 2020
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In the Footsteps of Crazy Horse: Cultural Text Set

Anchor Text: In the Footsteps of Crazy Horse, by Joseph Marshall

Audience: 5th Grade

Essential Question: Who was Crazy Horse? How might perspective change the answer to this question? What does it mean to follow "in his footsteps?"

Standards:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.2
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.6
Describe how a narrator's or speaker's point of view influences how events are described.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.9
Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics.

IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF CRAZY HORSE by Joseph Marshall III - AICL Review

Text Type: Novel
Grade Level Complexity: At or Below Grade Level

Summary: On a journey with his grandfather, Jimmy McLean learns about his Lakota heritage by visiting landmarks in the life of Crazy Horse, a legendary Lakota warrior. Along the way, his grandfather makes the past come alive by sharing “the way it was” through the tradition of oral storytelling. By learning what it means to “follow in the footsteps of Crazy Horse,” Jimmy gains insight into himself.

Use: This text can be independently read by most 5th graders. The teacher can structure the pace of reading, leading discussions throughout. Focus areas should include how the grandfather describes different stages of Crazy Horse’s life: his childhood, his vision, his participation in battles, and his death. The results of these discussions can be recorded on a class-made graphic organizer. Students can write about the different characteristics of Crazy Horse as portrayed in the novel. How would Jimmy answer the question: “What does it mean to follow in the footsteps of Crazy Horse and keep his legacy alive in the present?”

Crazy Horse Biography - NPS

Text Type: Online Informational Article
Grade Level Complexity: Above Grade Level

Summary: This short biography of Crazy Horse is written by the US National Park Service.

Use: Because this article is above grade level, it should be teacher led and peer supported. One example would be to “jigsaw” the article so that groups of students work together to understand different sections. Guiding questions should include how this article describes Crazy Horse’s childhood and adolescence (pgphs 1-4), his vision (pgphs 6-8), his participation in battles (pgphs 10-13), and his death (pgph 14). In a whole class graphic organizer, students can compare these descriptions with how they were described in the anchor text. What is different? Why do they think there might be differences?

Crazy Horse Memorial News Video

Text Type: News Report Video (8 min)
Grade Level Complexity: At Grade Level

Summary: This biography of Crazy Horse is written by the US National Park Service.

Use: This video can be watched as a whole class, then discussed in pairs or small groups, and then together as a whole class. The Lakota memorialize Crazy Horse by passing down their stories, as we read in the anchor text. There is another monumental attempt to remember Crazy Horse’s legacy. Watch the video and see how the Ziolkowski family is attempting to carry on the story of Crazy Horse. What do students think about this endeavor? Do students have any questions?

Crazy Horse Biography - Memorial Website

Text Type: Online Article
Grade Level Complexity: Above Grade Level

Summary: This biography of Crazy Horse is written by the Crazy Horse Memorial staff.

Use: Because this article is above grade level, it should be teacher led and peer supported. One example would be to “jigsaw” the article so that groups of students work together to understand different sections. Guiding questions should include how this article describes Crazy Horse’s childhood and adolescence (pgph 2-3), his vision (pgph 2), his participation in battles (pgphs 4-5), and his death (pgph 6). In a whole class graphic organizer, students can compare these descriptions with how they were described in the anchor text and the NPS biography. What is different? Why do they think there might be differences?

Who Speaks for Crazy Horse? | The New Yorker

Text Type: Online Article Excerpt (audio available)
Grade Level Complexity: Above Grade Level

Summary: This article examines different perspectives on the Crazy Horse Memorial.

Use: This article as a whole is above grade level, but the most relevant part for the purposes of this text set is a short excerpt of paragraphs 11-14. Using a short part of this article will help support students’ comprehension, though it should still be teacher-led and could be conducive to listening to the same excerpt of the audio version of the article. These particular paragraphs focus on how different people feel about the memorial, including the family who owns it and members of the Lakota tribes. Students should compare how they felt about the memorial after watching the news clip with how they currently feel after reading more opinions. Has their perception about whether the memorial is a fitting tribute to Crazy Horse changed?

Crazy Horse Image - History Detectives, PBS

Text Type: Investigative Journalism Video (15 Minutes)
Grade Level Complexity: At Grade Level

Summary: This video follows an investigation into whether historical images of Crazy Horse are authentic.

Use: This video can be watched and discussed as a whole class. Several of the sources we have come across so far have mentioned that Crazy Horse specifically did not want to be photographed. Why was that? Why do students think so many people want to believe pictures of him exist? Does understanding Crazy Horse’s perspective on being photographed change how students feel about the Crazy Horse Memorial?

the message of crazy horse by Lucille Clifton

Text Type: Short Poem
Grade Level Complexity: Below Grade Level (text only, not including meaning analysis)

Use: Students can read and respond independently to this poem but may benefit from teacher-led discussion and support. This would be a good way to end the unit -- Students can consider what they believe “the message of Crazy Horse” to be. Now that they have heard many different perspectives, what do they think Crazy Horse’s lasting message should be? What is the best way to remember him? Do they think this is being done? Students can respond in an essay, poem, or other artistic manner.