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Updated by Julian Knight on Dec 21, 2018
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MedJobNetwork - Best of 2018

As we turn the page on 2018 here's a look back what you colleagues like the most on our physician career and lifestyle blog.

Ranking points physicians toward South Dakota | MedJobNetwork Blog

South Dakota’s nickname may be the Mount Rushmore State, but for physicians it’s the land of opportunity, according to personal finance website WalletHub.

Tabata training – MedJobNetwork Lifestyle Blog

I’m in really good shape. Well, more like really not bad shape. I eat healthy food (see my previous column on diet) and work out nearly every day. I have done so for years. I’ve learned that working out doesn’t make much difference with my weight, but it makes a huge difference with my mood, even more so than meditating. That’s why I’ll never give it up.

How to Give a Better Handshake (And why it’s important) | MedJobNetwork Blog

Handshakes come both at the critical first moment and at the close of patient interactions. The first helps establish who you are as a doctor and reassures your patient that you’re both capable and trustworthy. At the end of the visit, it seals the agreement wherein they commit to take your advice (or at least try) and you commit to do whatever necessary to help them.

Physician Profile: Chief Wellness Officer Aims to Prevent Burnout – MedJobNetwork Lifestyle Blog

Stanford Medicine hired Dr. Tait Shanafelt as chief wellness officer last year, not so much for the well-being of the patients — but of the physicians.

Two more and counting: Suicide in medical trainees | MedJobNetwork Blog

Like everyone in the arc of social media impact, I was shocked and terribly saddened by the recent suicides of two New York women in medicine – a final-year medical student on May 1 and a second-year resident on May 5. As a specialist in physician health, a former training director, a long-standing member of our institution’s medical student admissions committee, and the ombudsman for our medical students, I am finding these tragedies harder and harder to reconcile. Something isn’t working. But before I get to that, what follows is a bulleted list of some events of the past couple of weeks that may give a context for my statements and have informed my two recommendations.