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Updated by Kelly Wiggins on Jun 07, 2019
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Top-10 Weed Themed Songs

We rank the top -10 weed songs of all time.

10

Legalize It – Peter Tosh (1976)

Legalize It – Peter Tosh (1976)

Legalize It is an album and song by Peter Tosh. Legalize It was Tosh's debut album as a solo artist after leaving The Wailers. It was recorded at Treasure Isle and Randy's, Kingston, Jamaica in 1975 and released in Jamaica in the same year.

Legalize It is one of the three solo albums released in 1976 by Wailers members, along with Bunny Wailer's album Blackheart Man and Bob Marley's Rastaman Vibration.

The song was written in response to his ongoing victimization by the Jamaican police and as a political piece pushing for the legalization of cannabis, particularly for medical use.

In 1977, Tosh backed this up by saying 'We are the victims of Rasclot circumstances. Victimization, colonialism, gonna lead to bloodbath'. Tosh also said 'Herb will become like cigarettes', in an NME interview in 1978.

The song was banned when released in Jamaica in 1975. Attempts to suppress the song failed, however, catapulting Tosh to international fame.

The album was released in the United States in June 1976 and appeared on the Billboard 200 album chart for two weeks, peaking at No. 199. In 1999, the album was certified platinum by the

Recording Industry Association of America for over one million copies sold.

The album was included in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.

9

Kaya – Bob Marley (1978)

Kaya – Bob Marley (1978)

The album has a very relaxed, laid back sound, lacking much of the militant quality of the Wailers lyrically and musically. They received criticism for 'going soft' as a result of the general sound of the album as well as the theme: songs primarily revolving around love, as well as marijuana.

The album's release coincided with the One Love Peace Concert, heralding Marley's triumphant return to Jamaica from exodus in London. Two of the songs are new versions of tracks from the 1971 album Soul Revolution. Well-known songs from the album include "Is This Love" and "Satisfy My Soul". Kaya reached the top five in the UK album charts.

8

4. The Mighty Diamonds, “Pass the Kouchie” (1981)

4. The Mighty Diamonds, “Pass the Kouchie” (1981)

"Pass the Koutchie", written by Ferguson and Simpson, became an international hit twice, when first released (on their 1982 album Changes[9]) and again when it was covered by Musical Youth with altered lyric to remove the drug references, and released as "Pass the Dutchie".

7

Afroman, “Because I Got High” (2000)

Afroman, “Because I Got High” (2000)

"Because I Got High" is a song by American rapper Afroman from his album of the same name. The lyrics of the song describe how cannabis[citation needed] use is degrading the narrator's quality of life. The song, which was written in only a few minutes, rose from obscurity to popularity after it was circulated around the Internet and was featured on The Howard Stern Show.

The song explains how the narrator has forgotten to clean his room, failed his college class (which he plans to take next semester), sold kush (after losing his job), missed court dates, had his paycheck garnished due to missed child support payments, gambled away his car payment, became a paraplegic as the result of a police chase, lost his family (including his wife and children), had messed up his "entire life", and is now homeless "because [he] got high" – he ultimately decides to end the song, and states that he is "singing the whole thing wrong, because [he is] high". After this, Afroman mentions his name and birthplace (East Palmdale), says the tumbleweed he smokes is "bomb as hell" and then says he does not believe in Hitler (a reference to John Lennon's "God"). The music video was directed by Kevin Smith and featured Jay and Silent Bob smoking with Afroman, a cameo by 'Beer Man', as well as a glimpse of the Quick Stop where Clerks was filmed.

6

Redman "How to Roll a Blunt" (1992)

Redman "How to Roll a Blunt" (1992)

How to roll a Blunt appears on the album "How High" and is a soundtrack album for the film "How High", starring hip-hop stars Method Man & Redman.

Redman is an American rapper, DJ, record producer, and actor. He rose to fame in the early 1990s as an artist on the Def Jam label. He is also well known for his collaborations with his close friend Method Man, as one-half of the rap duo Method Man & Redman, including their starring roles in films and sitcoms. He was also a member of the Def Squad in the late 1990s.

5

Cypress Hill “Hits From the Bong” (1993)

Cypress Hill “Hits From the Bong” (1993)

"Hits from the Bong" appeared on Black Sunday, the second studio album by American hip hop group Cypress Hill, released on July 20, 1993. The album debuted at number one on the US Billboard 200, selling 261,000 copies in its first week of sales and becoming the highest Soundscan recording for a rap group at the time. The album went Triple platinum in the U.S., with 3.4 million units sold.

The songs "Hits from the Bong" and "I Wanna Get High" were used in the 2001 film How High. "I Wanna Get High" was also featured in the vampire junkie film "The Addiction." "Hits from the Bong" was also heard in the 2011 film Hall Pass.

4

Gang Starr "Take Two and Pass " (1992)

Gang Starr "Take Two and Pass " (1992)

Gang Starr was an East Coast hip hop duo that consisted of rapper Guru and DJ/producer DJ Premier.

Daily Operation is the third studio album by American hip hop duo Gang Starr, released on May 5, 1992 by Chrysalis Records. Despite the album originally only being rewarded 3.5 mics in The Source, it was selected as one of The Source's 100 Best Hip Hop Albums in 1998.

3

Tone Loc "Cheeba Cheeba" (1989)

Tone Loc "Cheeba Cheeba" (1989)

Lōc-ed After Dark is the debut studio album by American rapper Tone Lōc. It was released by Delicious Vinyl on January 23, 1989. It featured three singles, "Wild Thing", "Funky Cold Medina", and "I Got It Goin' On".[4] In the week of April 15, it reached number 1 on the Billboard 200 chart. It was certified Double Platinum by the RIAA. The album cover is based on Donald Byrd's 1963 album, A New Perspective.

2

Bob Dylan "Rainy Day Women #12 & 35" (1966)

Bob Dylan "Rainy Day Women #12 & 35" (1966)

"Rainy Day Women ♯12 & 35" is a song by Bob Dylan. It is the opening track of his 1966 album, Blonde on Blonde. It was initially released as a single in April 1966, reaching No. 7 in the UK and No. 2 in the US chart. "Rainy Day Women", recorded in the Nashville studio of Columbia Records, features a raucous brass band backing track.

The song's title does not appear anywhere in the lyrics and there has been much debate over the meaning of the recurrent chorus, "Everybody must get stoned". This has made the song controversial, being labelled by some commentators as "a drug song".

1

Cab Calloway "Reefer Man" (1932)

Cab Calloway "Reefer Man" (1932)

Have You Ever Met That Funny Reefer Man", often known simply as "The Reefer Man", is a 1932 American jazz song composed by J. Russel Robinson, with lyrics by Andy Razaf. It was first recorded by Cab Calloway and his orchestra, with versions by others over the years, including by Harlan Lattimore, Murphy's Law and Big Bad Voodoo Daddy.

The song as performed by Calloway appears in the 1933 film International House.