List Headline Image
Updated by Erika Yigzaw on Apr 12, 2018
Headline for Top High Fiber Foods
 REPORT
Erika Yigzaw Erika Yigzaw
Owner
11 items   80 followers   20 votes   879 views

Top High Fiber Foods

Holistic nutrition is one of the departments here at ACHS.edu and you can't work here and not get a wee bit obsessed! Our current office obsession is fiber!!! Turns out we are not alone! 44% of Americans want more fiber! http://newhope360.com/product-development/44-americans-want-more-fiber-products-says-study?cid=nl_nfm_iu

Source: http://www.blogger.com/blogger.g?blogID=1376659465670524416#editor/target=post;postID=6981579837278766791

5

Blueberries

Blueberries

Blueberries provide about 3.5 grams of fiber, and roughly 40 calories for 50 berries. Choose organic as blueberries are on the EWG dirty dozen list 2012 [http://www.ewg.org/foodnews/summary/]. Again, blueberries grow well here in the Pacific North West, although take a few years to fruit well. Mulch with wood chips as they love acidic soil.

2

Raspberries

Raspberries

Raspberries rank as one of the highest high fiber low calorie foods, at 8.0 grams of fiber and just 64 calories per serving (1-cup) (1 calorie per raspberry!) (Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/27530-list-highfiber-lowcalorie-foods/#ixzz20oS6PXmx http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=nutrientprofile&dbid=23) . They are delicious and we can grow our own here in Oregon! Yay!

10

Peas

Peas

Cooked peas, at a whopping 8.8 g of fiber and a low 67 calories per cup serving size. Turn a cup of peas into instant soup with a stick blender and some vegetable stock.

11

Barley

Barley

Just one cup of barley has 13.6 grams of fiber in 270 calories – add a cup of barley to your vegetable soup for a hearty winter way to increase fiber! Plus barley is a great source of selenium [http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=127]

3

Pears

Pears

Pears have about 5.1 grams of fiber and only 51 calories for a medium sized pear[Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/27530-list-highfiber-lowcalorie-foods/#ixzz20oSDSh7g}. They are easy to pack in a lunch and store well. They are also easy to grow here in Oregon.

4

Apples

Apples

Apples provide about 4.4 grams of fiber, at roughly 55 calories for a small apple. Choose organic as apples are on the EWG dirty dozen list 2012[http://www.ewg.org/foodnews/summary/]. Apples are easy to grow here in Oregon and many parts of the US, with the newer columnar varieties letting you grow pounds of fruit in a small garden or even a container!

6

Strawberries

Strawberries

Strawberries provide about 3.3 grams of fiber and average about 2 calories per strawberry. Choose organic as strawberries are on the EWG dirty dozen list 2012 [http://www.ewg.org/foodnews/summary/]. Grow even a few strawberry plants in a barrel or tuck them into ornamental garden beds where the foliage stays a lovely dark green throughout the summer while providing you with berries!

Ellagitannins from Rubus Berries for the Control of Gastric Inflammation: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

Josep Bassaganya-Riera, Editor Abstract Ellagitannins have shown anti-inflammatory and anti- Helicobacter pylori properties; however, their anti-inflammatory activity at gastric level was not previously investigated. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effects of ellagitannins from Rubus berries on gastric inflammation. Ellagitannin enriched extracts (ETs) were prepared from Rubus fruticosus L.

12

Avocados

Avocados

Fiber: 6.7 grams per half, raw.

Turnip greens
What's New and Beneficial About Turnip Greens
Household, psychosocial, and individual-level factors associated with fruit, vegetable, and fiber intake among low-in...

Childhood obesity, one of the greatest challenges to public health, disproportionately affects low-income urban minority populations. Fruits and vegetables (FV) are nutrient dense foods that may be inversely associated with excessive weight gain. We aimed to identify the individual characteristic, psychosocial, and household factors influencing FV and fiber consumption in low-income African-American (AA) youth in Baltimore, MD.