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Updated by Jared Margulies on Mar 17, 2013
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Spring 2013 Statistics @ UMBC

Statistics on offer!

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Stats 614

Stats 614

MoWe 7:10-8:25 -Martin Klein
This is a graduate-level introduction to statistical methods used in environmental applications. The following will be emphasized throughout the course: non-parametric methods using environmental data; methods of analyzing data that are below the limit of detection; sampling designs, including stratified sampling, composite sampling and ranked set sampling; sampling to determine hot spots; trend estimation methods for uncorrelated, correlated and seasonal data; discussion of some basic ideas from spatial statistics; and environmental data analysis using statistical software. Prerequisite: STAT 453/653 or permission of the instructor.

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Stats 601- Applied Stats I

Stats 601- Applied Stats I

MoWe 7:10-8:25 - Kofi Adragni

Theory and applications of the linear regression model, least squares estimation, model building, influence diagnostics, multi-collinearity and graphical analysis of residuals, nonlinear regression, logistic regression. Data analysis using statistical packages and other topics as time permits. Prerequisite: STAT 453 or permission of the instructor.

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BIOM 301- Introduction to Biometrics

BIOM 301- Introduction to Biometrics

TuTh 12:30-1:20, plus M or T discussion section
BIOM301 Introduction to Biometrics; (3 credits) Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD. GenEd: Fundamental Studies - Analytic Reasoning.
Prerequisite: MATH113 or MATH115. Credit only granted for: BIOM301, BMGT230, CCJS200, ECON321, EDMS451, GEOG306, GVPT422, PSYC200, or SOCY201. Descriptive statistics, introduction to probability, sampling, confidence interval estimation, hypothesis testing, simple regression and correlation. Emphasis on simple applications of statistical techniques and interpretation of statistical results.

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STAT 400- Applied Probability and Statistics I @College Park

STAT 400- Applied Probability and Statistics I @College Park

TuTh 12:30-1:45, plus W discussion section
STAT400 Applied Probability and Statistics I; (3 credits) Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD.
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in MATH131; or MATH141; or students who have taken courses with similar or comparable course content may contact the department. Credit only granted for: BMGT231, ENEE324, or STAT400. Additional information: Not acceptable toward graduate degrees in MATH/STAT/AMSC. Random variables, standard distributions, moments, law of large numbers and central limit theorem. Sampling methods, estimation of parameters, testing of hypotheses.

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STAT 420 Introduction to Statistics @ College Park

STAT 420 Introduction to Statistics @ College Park

TuTh- 5:00-6:15
STAT420 Introduction to Statistics; (3 credits) Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD.
Prerequisite: SURV410 or STAT410. Also offered as: SURV420. Credit only granted for: STAT420 or SURV420. Point estimation, sufficiency, completeness, Cramer-Rao inequality, maximum likelihood. Confidence intervals for parameters of normal distribution. Hypothesis testing, most powerful tests, likelihood ratio tests. Chi-square tests, analysis of variance, regression, correlation. Nonparametric methods. Offered Spring only.

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SOCY 604- Statistical Analysis

SOCY 604- Statistical Analysis

W 4:30-7:00
An introduction to the concepts and methods of descriptive and inferential statistical techniques. Bi-variate and multi-variate statistical techniques will be discussed. Note: Also listed as PUBL 604. Prerequisites: SOCY/PUBL 600 or their equivalents and consent of instructor.

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LLC 645

LLC 645

We 4:30PM - 7:50PM
class number 2894
Dr. Galindo
This is a course in the application of basic statistics in a variety of educational research settings. Emphasis is placed upon the use of descriptive statistics, the interpretation and construction of data collection instruments and the application of basic research paradigms. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

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SOC 619 Qualitative Methods in Social Research

SOC 619 Qualitative Methods in Social Research

Tu 4:30-7:00
This course will focus on the styles of research, analysis and epistemologies associated with qualitative research in the applied social and policy sciences. As an increasingly important mode of inquiry, qualitative, multi-method approaches are particularly relevant to the study of social interaction and behavior in natural settings. Qualitative approaches involve collecting and analyzing empirical information from multiple sources, such as first-person accounts, life histories, visual/printed records, semi-structured and open-ended interviews, informal and formal observations, and biographical and autobiographical materials. Students in the course will learn how to design, collect and analyze qualitative information by conducting a small, semester-long study. Sections of the research project will be prepared, presented and evaluated throughout the course.

GEOL 489V/789V Statistics for Geoscientists

Practical approach to basic statistics applied in the geosciences. Experimental design, elementary statistics and probability, sequence analysis, spatial analysis, linear regression, nonparametric statistics, bivariate, multivariate and principal components analysis of variance, hypothesis testing. Problem sets and participatory discussion of statistical applications in the current literature.

MEES698T Special Topics in Marine-Estuarine-Environmental Sciences: Environmental Statistics

TuTh...... 8:30am-10:00am (HJP 1213B)
F.........11:00am-12:00pm (HJP 1213B) Dis
MEES698T Special Topics in Marine-Estuarine-Environmental Sciences: Environmental Statistics; (3 credits) Grade Method: REG/AUD.
Course is taught at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory and on the Inte teractive Video Network.

From the Professor (who I emailed:)

My class is probably one of the most challenging statistical class within our MEES program. The focus of class is to understand what is going on behind the output from R or SAS, i.e., we will do quite a bit hand calculation. We will have an exercise session every Friday to practice R and hopefully that will help the students get a better understanding of the class contents.

If you are not scared by the equations and is willing to spend a little bit more time, you should be fine. I don't want to give you some false impression that this class is easy and later you think it very difficult at your level. This is really your call. If you decide to take the class, I will do my best to help.