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Updated by Meagan Hollman on Mar 18, 2013
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5 Design Tips to Consider When Choosing an Awning for Your Home

Awnings not only provide protection from the elements, but decorative aesthetics for residences and buildings. Yet sometimes they can be an eye-sore. Before you install awnings on your Utah dwelling, there are some things you need to learn about exterior decorating.

1

Setting.

Setting.

First consider whether you want your awning to become the focal point of your home or blend into its surroundings. If the latter, choose an awning that complements the setting. Earth tones will make your home nuzzled in the Rockies look picturesque. If your home is in southern Utah, forest green or orange-red awnings will make your home part of the landscape. Bright, quirky hues are perfect for beach or lakefront properties, while beige or black-and-white stripes suite vintage, downtown settings. Connect your home to the landscape by accenting the yellow wildflowers growing nearby.

2

Architecture.

Architecture.

It is important to match the color of your awnings to the architectural style of your home. Traditional colors like neutrals, navy and hunter green work well with traditional architecture. Bar stripes look quaint on cottage homes, and skin tones like beige and salmon in either striped or solid fashion match Southwestern, desert stucco.

3

Design.

Design.

The design of your awnings should complement the architectural era of your Utah home. Contemporary homes are favored by bold contrasts and bright colors. Scalloped valance awnings make traditional, ma-and-pa homes look cozy. As a general rule, go simple on design and color for homes with creative architectural elements or multiple angles on the roof. In these cases, you want the awnings to blend so focus is kept on the artistic elements of the home.

4

Colors and Patterns.

Colors and Patterns.

The color and pattern of the awning should reflect the interior décor of your home—especially the entrance hallway or front room. Awnings should provide visual continuity between exterior and interior design. In other words, the two should blend seamlessly. You should also match awning patterns with the style of your home. For example, a ranch-style home in central Utah may be overwhelmed by awnings with fat stripes, which are more suited for chic storefronts. Consider the size of the awning as well; paper-thin stripes can look busy on wide expanses of fabric.

5

Shape.

Shape.

Here’s a general rule when it comes to awning shapes: if the door or window is rectangular or square, choose straight or rectangular awnings—never arched. But if the door or window is arched, then choose arched awnings—never straight. Pretty simple. Do not, however, use domed awnings on homes, as they are more appropriately suited for businesses.