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Updated by Angelo Guce on Sep 24, 2017
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Top 10 Most Popular Foods in Asia

1

Spiced Edamame

Spiced Edamame

 Filipino Style Recipe: porkchop aloha is another quick and easy sweetpork dish. This dish is consists of fried porkchops and pineapple slices cooked in a blend of pineapple juice, soy sauce, honey and brown sugar, bbq sauce and a slice of pineapple.

2

Kimchi

Kimchi

Kimchi (/ˈkɪmtʃiː/; Korean: 김치, translit. gimchi, IPA: [kim.tɕʰi]), a staple in Korean cuisine, is a traditional side dish made from salted and fermented vegetables, most commonly napa cabbage and Korean radishes, with a variety of seasonings including chili powder, scallions, garlic, ginger, and jeotgal (salted seafood). There are hundreds of varieties of kimchi made with different vegetables as the main ingredients. In traditional preparations, kimchi was stored underground in jars to keep cool, and unfrozen during the winter months. These days, kimchi refrigerators are used instead.

Nutrient content:
Some credit Korea's industrious energy as a people, and their nation's rapid economic growth, in part to eating the dish. Kimchi is made of various vegetables and contains a high concentration of dietary fiber, while being low in calories. One serving also provides over 50% of the daily recommended amount of vitamin C and carotene. Most types of kimchi contain onions, garlic, ginger, and chili peppers, all of which are salutary. The vegetables used in kimchi also contribute to its overall nutritional value. Kimchi is rich in vitamin A, thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), calcium, and iron,and contains lactic acid bacteria, among those the typical species Lactobacillus kimchii.
During the 2003 SARS outbreak in Asia, many people believed that kimchi could protect against infection. While there was no scientific evidence to support this belief, kimchi sales rose by 40%.

3

Bulgogi

Bulgogi

Bulgogi (/bʊlˈɡoʊɡiː/ buul-GOH-ghee; from Korean bul-gogi [pul.ɡo.ɡi]), literally "fire meat" is a gui (Korean-style grilled or roasted dish) made of thin, marinated slices of beef or pork, grilled on a barbecue or on a stove-top griddle. It is also often stir-fried in a pan in home cooking. Sirloin, rib eye or briskets are frequently used cuts of beef for the dish. It is a beloved dish in both South and North Korea, having originated in the North. Bulgogi is ubiquitous in South Korea, from fancy restaurants to pan-ready kits at local supermarkets.

Bulgogi is believed to have originated from Goguryeo, when it was originally called maekjeok (맥적), with the beef being grilled on a skewer.It was called neobiani (너비아니), meaning "thinly spread" meat, in the Joseon Dynasty and was traditionally prepared especially for the wealthy and the nobility.

4

Cordon Bleu

Cordon Bleu

A cordon bleu or schnitzel cordon bleu is a dish of meat wrapped around cheese (or with cheese filling), then breaded and pan-fried or deep-fried. Veal or pork cordon bleu is made of veal or pork pounded thin and wrapped around a slice of ham and a slice of cheese, breaded, and then pan fried or baked. For chicken cordon bleu chicken breast is used instead of veal. Ham cordon bleu is ham stuffed with mushrooms and cheese.

The origins of cordon bleu as a schnitzel filled with cheese are in Switzerland, probably about the 1940s, first mentioned in a cookbook from 1949. The earliest reference to "chicken cordon bleu" in The New York Times is dated to 1967, while similar veal recipes are found from at least 1955

The French term cordon bleu is translated as "blue ribbon". According to Larousse Gastronomique cordon bleu "was originally a wide blue ribbon worn by members of the highest order of knighthood, L'Ordre des chevaliers du Saint-Esprit, instituted by Henri III of Francein 1578. By extension, the term has since been applied to food prepared to a very high standard and to outstanding cooks. The analogy no doubt arose from the similarity between the sash worn by the knights and the ribbons (generally blue) of a cook's apron

5

Buffalo Wings

Buffalo Wings

A Buffalo wing, in the cuisine of the United States, is an unbreaded chicken wing section (flat or drumette) that is generally deep-friedthen coated in a sauce consisting of a vinegar-based cayenne pepper hot sauce and melted butter prior to serving. The Buffalo wing was invented in 1964 at Anchor Bar in Buffalo, New York by Teressa Bellissimo.They are generally served hot, along with celerysticks and/or carrot sticks with blue cheese for dipping.

Buffalo wings have gained in popularity in the United States and abroad through the years with a number of North American restaurant chains featuring them as a main menu item. Currently, the appellation "Buffalo" is also now commonly applied to foods other than wings. Some of these include chicken fingers, chicken fries, chicken nuggets, popcorn chicken, shrimp, and pizza along with a host of other items that are seasoned with the Buffalo-style sauce or a Buffalo flavor seasoning.

6

Alo Ha Porkchops

Alo Ha Porkchops

The earliest documented reference to the term "edamame" dates from the year 1275, when the Japanese monk Nichiren wrote a note thanking a parishioner for the gift of "edamame" he had left at the temple. In 1406 during the Ming dynasty in China, the leaves of the soybeans were eaten and during outbreaks of famine, it was recommended for citizens to eat the beans whole or use them ground up and added to flour. Years later in China in 1620 they are referred to again, but as Maodou, which translates to the term "hairy bean". They are found in the records of the Runan vegetable gardens and stated as having a medicinal purpose as well as being a snack food. Edamame appeared in haikai verse in Japanese in the Edo period (1603 – 1868), with one example as early as 1638.They were first recognized in the United States in 1855 when a farmer commented on the difficulties he had shelling them after harvest. In March 1923, the immature soy bean is first referred to in text in the United States. In this book[specify] they are first pictured and shown as being eaten out of open shell pods. The first nutritional facts about them are published and some recipes are included as they were a new type of vegetable to the public. The earliest recorded usage in English of the word edamame is in 1951 in the journal Folklore Studies. Edamame appeared as a new term in the Oxford English Dictionary in 2003, and in the Merriam-Webster dictionary in 2008. In 2008, the first soybeans grown in Europe were sold in grocery stores as edamame and eaten as an alternative source of protein.

Nutrient content:
The United States Department of Agriculture states that edamame beans are a "soybean that can be eaten fresh and are best known as a snack with a nutritional punch".
Edamame and other preparations of soybeans are rich in protein, dietary fiber, and micronutrients, particularly folate, manganese, phosphorus and vitamin K (table).
The balance of fatty acids in 100 grams of edamame is 361 mg of omega-3 fatty acids to 1794 mg of omega-6 fatty acids.
As a significant source of plant protein, edamame beans are under research to establish whether a relationship exists for soy consumption with reduction of disease risk.

7

Adobo

Adobo

Philippine Adobo (from Spanish adobar: "marinade," "sauce" or "seasoning") is a popular dish and cooking process in Philippine cuisine that involves meat, seafood, or vegetables marinated in vinegar, soy sauce, and garlic, which is browned in oil, and simmered in the marinade. It has sometimes been considered as the official national dish in the Philippines.
The cooking method is indigenous to the Philippines. Early Filipinos cooked their food normally by roasting, steaming or boiling methods. To keep it fresh longer, food was often cooked by immersion in vinegar and salt. Thus, it is very likely that Filipinos could have been cooking meat in vinegar as a means of preservation. This process dates back to the Pre-Hispanic Period and was used for pork and chicken.[2][3][4][5]
When the Spanish Empire colonized the Philippines in the late 16th century and early 17th century, they encountered this cooking process. It was first recorded in the dictionary Vocabulario de la Lengua Tagala (1613) compiled by the Spanish Franciscan missionary Pedro de San Buenaventura. He referred to it as adobo de los naturales ("adobo of the native peoples").[5] Dishes prepared in this manner eventually came to be known by this name, with the original term for the dish now lost to history.
The Spanish also applied the term adobo to any native dish that was marinated before consumption. In the 1794 edition of Vocabulario de la lengua Tagala, it was applied to quilauìn (kinilaw) a related but different dish which also primarily uses vinegar.[8] In Vocabulario de la lengua Bisaya (1711), the term guinamus (verb form: gamus) was used to refer to any kind of marinades (adobo), from fish to pork. In modern Cebuano, guinamos refers to an entirely different dish - bagoong

8

Japchae

Japchae

Japchae (잡채; 雜菜) or stir-fried glass noodles and vegetables is a sweet and savory dish popular in Korean cuisine. Japchae is typically prepared with dangmyeon, a type of cellophane noodles made from sweet potato starch; assorted vegetables, meat, and mushrooms; and seasoned with soy sauce and sesame oil.
Once a royal dish, it is now one of the most popular traditional celebration dishes, often served on special occasions, such as weddings, birthdays (especially dol, the first birthday, and hwangap, the sixtieth), and holidays.] It is also popular for feeding crowds at banquets, feasts, parties, and potlucks, due to the ease of bulk preparation and its flexibility: japchae can be served warm, at room temperature, or cold from the refrigerator, as well as eaten freshly-made or the next day.
Japchae is commonly served as a banchan (side dish), though it may also be a main dish. It is sometimes served on a bed of rice: with rice, it is known as japchae-bap (잡채밥).

9

Ramen

Ramen

Ramen (/ˈrɑːmən/) (ラーメン rāmen, IPA: [ɾaꜜːmeɴ]) is a Japanese dish. It consists of Chinese-style wheat noodles served in a meat or (occasionally) fish-based broth, often flavored with soy sauce or miso, and uses toppings such as sliced pork (チャーシュー chāshū), dried seaweed (海苔 nori), menma (メンマ menma), and green onions (葱 negi). Nearly every region in Japan has its own variation of ramen, from the tonkotsu (pork bone broth) ramen of Kyushu to the miso ramen of Hokkaido.

10

Lasagna

Lasagna

Lasagne (/ləˈzænjə/ or /ləˈzɑːnjə/ or /ləˈsɑːnjə/, Italian pronunciation: [laˈzaɲɲe], singular lasagna) are wide, flat-shaped pasta, and possibly one of the oldest types of pasta. "Lasagne", or the singular "lasagna", commonly refers to a dish made with several layers of lasagne sheets alternated with sauces and other ingredients, such as meats and cheese.
Lasagne originated in Italy during the Middle Ages and has traditionally been ascribed to the city of Naples (Campania). The first recorded recipe was set down in the early 14th century Liber de Coquina (The Book of Cookery). It bore only a slight resemblance to the later traditional form of lasagne, featuring a fermented dough, flattened into a thin sheet, boiled, sprinkled with cheese and spices, and then eaten with the use of a small pointed stick. Other recipes written in the century following the Liber de Coquina recommended boiling the pasta in a chicken broth and dressing it with cheese and chicken fat, or in one case walnuts, in a recipe adapted for the Lenten fast.