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Updated by ClimateDiplomacy.org on Sep 20, 2017
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Fragile Cities

Articles and publications on urban development, urban violence, the fragility of cities, urbanization trends and climate challenges.

The Fragility of Cities | Climate Diplomacy

While research on climate change and urban violence are independently strong, few efforts have been made to understand the linkages between them. To date, there is little research or analysis on whether, where and how climate change adaptation and urban violence intersect and interact.

Understanding Fragile Cities – The Nexus Between Migration, Climate Change and Urban Fragility | Climate Diplomacy

World-wide, cities are on the advance. Today, they host more than half of the world's population and every minute, their population grows by 140 people: 200,000 a day, 1.5 million a week. Cities have become so powerful that some even sign international agreement with nation states, conducting their own foreign policy. However, the scale and pace of current urbanization trends poses a threat to even the best managed cities.This working paper by adelphi explores the new research field of city fragility and its links to climate change and migration.

Briefer: Coastal Megacities vs. the Sea: Climate and Security in Urban Spaces | Climate Diplomacy

Cities are on the sharp end of a range of risks from criminal violence, terrorism and war to demographic pressures, to climate and environmental change. Coastal megacities are especially at risk given the specific impacts of climate change they face, including accelerated global sea-level rise, increased storm frequency and severity, and destruction to critical infrastructure such as port facilities, rail and road linkages, and energy installations, all of which are amplified as urban populations become ever larger.

The Fragility of Cities | Resilience Compass Blog

As climate change drives more people from rural to urban settings, how will already fragile cities cope? What must be done to ensure that all cities are safe, sustainable places to live?

Tapping into the co-benefits of low-emission economy in cities – Discussion Paper | Climate Diplomacy

A low-emission transition will require profound changes in terms of infrastructure, business models as well as individual habits. In order to support this process adelphi, WiseEuropa and the Institute for Sustainable Development launched a Polish-German discussion on the benefits of a low-emission economy for local development. The discussion paper draws on this exchange, and offers a basis for further reflection about selected benefits based on evidence from Germany and Poland.

The Challenge of Fragile Cities – Takeaways from the Resilient Cities Congress | Resilience Compass Blog

On 4-5th May, adelphi was at the Resilient Cities Congress 2017 in Bonn to speak on a panel on ‘Violence and Climate Change in Cities’. The session was a unique and much required discussion on the interactions between climate change and conflict in urban settings.

UN Habitat report: Addressing Climate Change in National Urban Policy | Climate Diplomacy

At the Habitat III conference in Quito, the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN Habitat) launched, ‘Addressing Climate Change in National Urban Policy,’ a guide developed to assist all national urban policy stakeholders to better understand the intersection between national urban policy and climate change. While urbanization has brought great benefits and opportunities, cities are a major contributor to climate change.

Climate and Security in Urban Spaces | Resilience Compass Blog

Cities are already facing the brunt of a range of interacting risks from criminal violence, terrorism and war to demographic pressures, to climate and environmental change. Coastal megacities are especially at risk given the specific impacts of climate change they face, such as sea-level rise, increased storm frequency and severity, and destruction to infrastructure such as ports, rail and road networks. These risks are amplified as urban populations become ever larger.

Urbanization and Climate Diplomacy. The Stake of Cities in Global Climate Governance | Climate Diplomacy

This paper examines the relevance of cities and city networks in the current international climate policy architecture, especially with respect to the evolution of intended nationally determined contributions (INDCs) and climate finance as well as other developments linked to COP21.

Urbanisation, youth bulge and climate change: Understanding connected drivers of fragility in urban settings | Resili...

Following last month’s United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development (Habitat III) in Quito, Ecuador, it is worth raising attention to the key challenges and opportunities that the urbanisation process imposes on peaceful development. In fragile contexts, such as urban areas which are already highly exposed to multiple risks (including climate change, disasters, chronic poverty, insecurity and population displacement), the converging effects of climate change and growing youth populations can severely affect security risks.

Cities and Climate Diplomacy in the Asia Pacific | Climate Diplomacy

Diplomacy surrounding climate change happens on numerous levels. The current definition of climate diplomacy largely centres on the negotiations by state parties at the UNFCCC does not capture the full extent of current global trends and developments. Cities have become important actors in climate change discussions, formulating and implementing adaptation policies, and setting mitigation goals and targets.

Cities taking Action: what does Habitat III mean for Global Resilience Efforts? | Resilience Compass Blog

Last month, the urban community met in Quito, Ecuador for the United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development (Habitat III). At this event, United Nations (UN) member states agreed on the New Urban Agenda, which elucidates a broad vision for sustainable cities. Since returning from Quito, many participants of the Habitat III conference have asked: what now? What is the significance of the New Urban Agenda, and how will it be implemented? After some brief observations on the relevance of the Habitat III process in general, this article delves into the implications of the New Urban Agenda for urban resilience in particular.

Gender and Urban Climate Policy | Climate Diplomacy

In the context of gender and climate change, focus is often laid on women as a particularly vulnerable group that is strongly affected by the impacts of climate change. While this is a highly important issue to address, it should not be neglected that other aspects of climate change and climate policy also have gender dimensions. The implementation of gender-sensitive climate policies can maximise potential co-benefits and synergies.

Multifaceted crisis scenario in fragile cities: the case of Haiti | Resilience Compass Blog

A greater understanding of the relationship between climate change, migration, cities and conflict is required in the global research community. Clemence Finaz, a Research Associate at International Alert, illustrates the complexities of a densely-populated city’s vulnerability to compound risks, including climate-related disaster and a high level of insecurity using the case example of Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

Cities and Climate Diplomacy | Climate Diplomacy

Cities have become important actors in climate change discussions, formulating and implementing adaptation policies and setting mitigation goals and targets. Their role is also becoming increasingly important in the field of climate and environment as well as sustainability and green growth.

Habitat III and the New Urban Agenda – Lessons on Understanding Risk and Building Resilience | Resilience Compass Blog

This week, Heads of State will formally adopt a ‘New Urban Agenda’ in Quito, Ecuador. It will be the outcome document agreed upon at the third United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development (Habitat III) that aims to set the narrative for development in human settlements for the next ten to 20 years.

Building climate resilience in cities: lessons from New York | Resilience Compass Blog

We live in an urbanizing world. Up to two-thirds of the world’s population – some six billion people – may live in cities by 2050.Cities have emerged as first responders to climate change because they experience the impacts of natural disasters firsthand and because they produce up to 70 percent of greenhouse gas emissions.