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Updated by securerr.com on Dec 01, 2016
Headline for 5 Common Security Failures That Could Harm Any Company
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5 Common Security Failures That Could Harm Any Company

Some security experts have recently revealed horror stories of unencrypted emails and the blind acceptance of security audit reports by businesses. Many are concerned about the “insider threats.” So here’s 5 common security failures that could happen even at a large company and how to protect against them:

Source: http://securerr.com/5-common-security-failures-that-could-harm-any-company/

1

IT department yet to get realistic about vulnerabilities

IT department yet to get realistic about vulnerabilities

Solution is by getting over the hubris. Organizations are made to believe that full prevention/protection is possible and as a result they are overly reliant on blocking-based security systems. Breaches are bound to occur when businesses fail to tackle the slow identification of breaches.- list text here

2

Focusing too much on external risks

Focusing too much on external risks

Businesses should start considering the fact that insiders also pose security threats. It may not be in the form of deliberate sabotage or theft, of course. But lost or stolen devices or accidental data loss could have serious consequences.

3

Believing in “safe” sites

Believing in “safe” sites

Even the highly trusted websites could be compromised and use users data to serve malware. In fact, attackers now frequently target such sites because they deliver a valuable user base.

4

Thinking that your employees would follow all your security directives

Thinking that your employees would follow all your security directives

Despite news about email risks and enterprise training programs designed to prevent bad practices, many organizations report that between 30 to 70 percent of their employees still click links in test emails designed to see if users can recognize and avoid phishing attacks.

Here’s simple solution: Admit that your workers are a very weak link. And you should act accordingly.

5

Attributing security as IT problem

Attributing security as IT problem

Share the problem if you are getting buy-in and financial resources from the board of directors and upper management, said Michael Flickman, CTO officer of Diligent Board Member Services.

He is of the opinion that board members should have an opportunity to ask questions as and when require to the senior executives. They would be helpful in protecting data breaches by making sure that management has implemented internal awareness course and best practices.