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Updated by securerr.com on Nov 08, 2016
Headline for Online Safety Tips: Things Not to Do Online
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Online Safety Tips: Things Not to Do Online

It is very easy for you to get comfortable with sharing things within your friend networks online. However, between public Wi-Fi networks and social media, you may not actually know just how much you could be sharing with a total stranger.

Source: http://securerr.com/online-safety-tips-things-not-to-do-online/

1

Don’t send out sensitive information on a public Wi-Fi

Don’t send out sensitive information on a public Wi-Fi

If you wouldn’t want the whole world to know about what you are sharing, then don’t send it via a public Wi-Fi. Try to avoid accessing any financial information such as bank accounts, or sharing any personal details through email or social media.

It is very easy for someone to intercept the information that you are transmitting from your computer when you happen to be on open Wi-Fi.

2

Don’t share your phone number on the internet

Don’t share your phone number on the internet

Many people have finally wised up to this one, but you will still see Facebook posts that will pop up every once in a while that says “Hey, got a new number. XXX-XXX-XXXX!”

This could prove dangerous for your phone. Even though it is the quickest way to get your number out there to people who may want it, it is also highly likely to be viewed by marketers.

3

Don’t connect to any strange Wi-Fi networks

Don’t connect to any strange Wi-Fi networks

If you are really unsure which Wi-Fi network is the one that is provided by your local café, don’t just connect to any hub that is open. Ask an employee or manager for the credentials of their network. It isn’t unheard of for a criminal to set up hotspots in busy areas.

4

Don’t share vacation plans on social media

Don’t share vacation plans on social media

Sharing a status of your big trip to the park on Saturday may be a good idea if you are looking to have a big turnout of friends to join you, but not when it comes to home and personal safety.

For starters, you have just broadcasted where you are going to be at a certain time, which can be pretty dangerous if you have a stalker or a crazy ex.

Secondly, you are telling the time when you won’t be home, which can make you vulnerable to being robbed.

5

Don’t post everything to every social media network

Don’t post everything to every social media network

You have Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Tumblr all synced together so when you post an update on one network, it will post across all of them.

Although you are being applauded for your social efficiency and diligence, that isn’t always the best thing to do. Each platform has evolved with its very own set of expectations and practices.

6

Don’t share your children’s photos with their real names

Don’t share your children’s photos with their real names

Adults are able to un-tag themselves from images that they don’t want to be identified in, but children don’t have that option.

A lot of parents these days are referring to their children as a hashtag or a nickname which protects their identity without taking the fun out of sharing family photos.

7

Don’t share any private, identifiable information on social media

Don’t share any private, identifiable information on social media

It may be fun to talk about your pets with your friends on Instagram or Twitter, but if Fluffy is the answer to your security question, then you shouldn’t share that with the world. This may seem quite obvious, but sometimes you get wrapped up in an online conversation, and it is quite easy to let things slip out.

You may also want to keep quiet about your past home or current home locations or sharing anything that is very unique and identifiable. It could help someone fake your identity.

8

Don’t share any of your passwords

Don’t share any of your passwords

There are some situations where password-sharing is okay, such as HBO Go or Netflix passwords, but when it comes to email, banking, Twitter, or Facebook, there is no need to share your password.

9

Turn on two-factor authentication

Turn on two-factor authentication

Although it can be inconvenient, the two-factor authentication is the easiest and best way to keep your accounts from getting hacked. Whenever you log into an account from a new device, it will send an email or a text with a code that you input with your password.

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