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Headline for Methodist Women in Texas from 1845 to the Beginning of the Civil War
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Methodist Women in Texas from 1845 to the Beginning of the Civil War

This is my curation for the History Video Project for class. In this curation, I will be leaving sources and such about the effect that women in the Methodist church had on the Texas economy, society, and politically/religiously during a time of high stress and formation of the country.

Timeline of Women in Methodism - The United Methodist Church

UMC.org is the official online ministry of The United Methodist Church.

A starting point in which I can use to search these women during this time period that I am looking for.

METHODIST CHURCH

METHODIST CHURCH. The first ordained Methodist minister, and the first Protestant minister, to preach in Texas was William Stevenson, a member of the Tennessee Conference who preached at Pecan Point in what is now Red River County during an exploratory journey in the fall of 1815. When Claiborne Wrightqv's family moved to Pecan Point in 1816, they became the earliest Methodist family known in Texas. The first Texas appointment of the Methodist Episcopal Church (made by the Missouri Conference in 1818) was of Stevenson to the Mount Prairie (Arkansas) and "Peecon Point" Circuit. By 1822 this circuit had sixty-six members, one of whom was the first black Methodist in Texas. McMahan's Chapel, the oldest continuing congregation in Texas, was founded as a Methodist society by James Porter Stevenson near San Augustine in 1833. The word Texas first appears in Methodist appointments in 1834, when the recently constituted Mississippi Conference assigned Henry Stephenson to the Texas Mission, composed of the East Texas area around San Augustine. This initial missionary activity was contrary to Spanish and Mexican regulations, which permitted only the Catholic religion in the colony. When Texas won its independence from Mexico in 1836, the door was opened wider to Protestantism. In 1837 the Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church established a mission to the state and sent seasoned ministers to the republic. Martin Ruter was appointed to serve as superintendent of the mission, with the assistance of Robert Alexander and Littleton Fowler.qqv Within five months Ruter reported 325 members in twenty societies, twelve local preachers, and five church buildings under construction. Strengthened by able recruits, the Texas Mission grew so rapidly that it was organized as an annual conference in 1840, with 1,878 members (1,648 white and 230 "colored") gathered in three districts, and fourteen circuits served by seventeen preachers. By the time Texas joined the Union, the state had two annual conferences reporting a total of 6,693 members (5,498 white and 1,195 black) and fifty-nine circuit riders aided by sixty-eight local preachers.

Timeline

Timeline of Texas Women's History.

Guide to the United Methodist Church Records, 1784-1984, bulk 1800-1940

The United Methodist Church Records are comprised primarily of bound volumes of quarterly conference minutes that document the administrative life of church units (circuits, charges, and churches) in the N.C. Conference (1784-1974, bulk 1841-1919) and ...

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UMW

UMW

Brief history of women in the methodist religion. Some about texas.

Black Churches in Texas: A Guide to Historic Congregations (Centennial Series of the Association of Former Students, ...

Black Churches in Texas: A Guide to Historic Congregations (Centennial Series of the Association of Former Students, Texas A&M University) - Kindle edition by Clyde McQueen. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Black Churches in Texas: A Guide to Historic Congregations (Centennial Series of the Association of Former Students, Texas A&M University).

White Metropolis: Race, Ethnicity, and Religion in Dallas, 1841-2001 0th Edition

White Metropolis: Race, Ethnicity, and Religion in Dallas, 1841-2001 [Michael Phillips] on Amazon.com. FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Winner, T. R. Fehrenbach Award, Texas Historical Commission, 2007 From the nineteenth century until today