List Headline Image
Updated by marshall-kerby on Oct 16, 2016
Headline for Freedman's Bureau in Texas
 REPORT
11 items   1 followers   0 votes   4 views

Freedman's Bureau in Texas

Here is a list of primary and secondary sources on the Freedmen's Bureau's struggles and accomplishments, during post-Civil War Texas.

The Freedmen's Bureau in Texas

Secondary Source: "The Freedmen's Bureau in Texas", CLAUDE ELLIOTT Originally published in the Southwestern Historical Quarterly , vol. 56, no. 1 (July 1952), Pp. 1-24.

  • Gives a very detailed history of the activities and dealings the Bureau dealt with on a daily basis.
  • A good Chronological order of events in different areas throughout Texas.
2

Major Gen. Oliver O. Howard, On May 12, 1865, was appointed as its chief commissioner over the entire bureau.

Major Gen. Oliver O. Howard, On May 12, 1865, was appointed as its chief commissioner over the entire bureau.

Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard, http://darrow.law.umn.edu/photo.php?pid=925

3

General E. M. Gregory, appointed Assistant Commissioner in Texas. His duty station was in Galveston.

General E. M. Gregory, appointed Assistant Commissioner in Texas. His duty station was in Galveston.
FREEDMEN'S BUREAU, Texas State Historical Assoc., Secondary source.

FREEDMEN'S BUREAU. The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, commonly known as the Freedmen's Bureau, was established by Congress in March 1865 as a branch of the United States Army. It was to be a temporary agency. Its functions were to provide relief to the thousands of refugees, black and white, who had been left homeless by the Civil War; to supervise affairs related to newly freed slaves in the southern states; and to administer all land abandoned by Confederates or confiscated from them during the war. Since the profits from administering the lands were to provide funds for the operation of the bureau, the bill establishing the agency did not appropriate money for it. President Andrew Johnson, however, returned most of the confiscated property to its owners, and Congress was forced to appropriate funds for the bureau's operations after the first year. Gen. Oliver Otis Howard was commissioner of the bureau throughout its existence. Under Howard was an extensive hierarchy of assistants and subassistants. Officers working with the bureau at the state level were headed by an assistant commissioner and included a superintendent of education, a traveling inspector, and, during the early months of the bureau's activities, a surgeon-in-chief.

Overreached on All Sides: The Freedmen's Bureau Administrators in Texas, 1865-1868 Hardcover – December 1, 1991 http:...

Secondary Source : Overreached on All Sides: The Freedmen's Bureau Administrators in Texas, 1865-1868 [William L. Richter] At the end of the Civil War, the U.S. government recognized some responsibility for the former slaves that its battles and proclamations had freed. It established the Bureau of Refugees.

Neal, Diane and Kremm, Thomas W. (1989) "What Shall we do with the Negro?: The Freedmen's Bureau in Texas," East Texa...

Academic Journal, Chronological order of events about the Freedmen;s Bureau operated in Texas.

Freedmen's Bureau - Registered Reports of Murders and Outrages

Primary Source: Records of the Assistant Commissioner for the State of Texas Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, 1865 - 1869
National Archives Microfilm Publication M821, Roll 32
"Registered Reports of Murders and Outrages, Sept. 1866 - July 1867"

The Freedmen's Bureau Online

Primary Source: Report from Washington County, Texas Records of the Assistant Commissioner for the State of Texas Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, 1865 - 1869
National Archives Microfilm Publication M821, Roll 32
"Registered Reports of Murders and Outrages, Sept. 1866 - July 1867"