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Former Slaves and their Influence on the Abolitionist Movement.

List of primary and secondary sources that speak on the life of slaves and how former slaves influenced the abolitionist movement.

"Been Here So Long": American Slave Narratives

These narratives are not the direct transciptions of the interviews, and the forms they take differ from narrative to narrative. According to Rawick, Scott Bond's narrative appears to have been dictated rather than a simple response to questions. Charles Williams' autobiography is his own work, originally written in pencil in a series of notebooks. Both the Bond and Williams narratives are of much greater length than the rest.

Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936-1938

The Library of Congress presents these documents as part of the record of the past. These primary historical documents reflect the attitudes, perspectives, and beliefs of different times. The Library of Congress does not endorse the views expressed in these collections, which may contain materials offensive to some readers.

Charles Waddell Chesnutt, 1858-1932. Frederick Douglass.

Frederick Douglass. By Charles Waddell Chesnutt, 1858-1932
One of the earliest biographies of Frederick Douglass.

Frederick Douglass, 1818-1895. My Bondage and My Freedom. Part I. Life as a Slave. Part II. Life as a Freeman.

My Bondage and My Freedom. Part I. Life as a Slave. Part II. Life as a Freeman. By Frederick Douglass, 1818-1895

Frederick Douglass, 1818-1895. The Heroic Slave. From Autographs for Freedom, Ed. Julia Griffiths

The Heroic Slave. From Autographs for Freedom, Ed. Julia Griffiths By Frederick Douglass, 1817?-1895

FREDERICK DOUGLASS by Booker T. Washington

Frederick Douglass. By Booker T. Washington, 1856-1915

Frederick Douglass Papers at the Library of Congress

The Frederick Douglass Papers at the Library of Congress presents the papers of the nineteenth-century African American abolitionist who escaped from slavery and then risked his freedom by becoming an outspoken antislavery lecturer, writer, and publisher. The online collection, containing approximately 7,400 items (38,000 images), spans the years 1841-1964, with the bulk of the material dating from 1862 to 1865. Many of Douglass’s earlier ...

Frederick Douglass: The Colored Orator. by Frederic May Holland, 1836-1908.

Frederick Douglass The Colored Orator. By Frederic May Holland, 1836-1908

Frederick Douglass The Orator. Containing an Account of His Life; His Eminent Public Services; His Brilliant Career a...

Frederick Douglass The Orator. Containing an Account of His Life; His Eminent Public Services; His Brilliant Career as Orator; Selections from His Speeches and Writings. By James M. Gregory (James Monroe), 1849-1915

"I will be heard!" Abolitionism in America

In Their Own Words: Slave Narratives

LIFE AND TIMES OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS, WRITTEN BY HIMSELF.

Life and Times of Frederick Douglass: His Early Life as a Slave, His Escape from Bondage, and His Complete History to the Present Time By Frederick Douglass, 1818-1895

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave by Douglass

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass is an 1845 memoir and treatise on abolition written by famous orator and former slave Frederick Douglass. It is generally held to be the most famous of a number of narratives written by former slaves during the same period.

North American Slave Narratives

"North American Slave Narratives" collects books and articles that document the individual and collective story of African Americans struggling for freedom and human rights in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth centuries.

Slave Narratives

The Civil War Home Page contains thousands of pages of Civil War material including Photos, Images, Battles, Documents, Associations, Letters & Diaries, Research Records, Biographical Information, Reenacting and Unit Information.

Teaching American History- Frederick Douglass' “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?”

He who could address this audience without a quailing sensation, has stronger nerves than I have. I do not remember ever to have appeared as a speaker before any assembly more shrinkingly, nor with greater distrust of my ability, than I do this day. A feeling has crept over me, quite unfavorable to the exercise of my limited powers of speech. The task before me is one which requires much previous thought and study for its proper performance. I know that apologies of this sort are generally considered flat and unmeaning. I trust, however, that mine will not be so considered. Should I seem at ease, my appearance would much misrepresent me. The little experience I have had in addressing public meetings, in country schoolhouses, avails me nothing on the present occasion.

The Slave, Freedom, or Liberation Narrative

Slave narrative: definitions, links, examples