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Updated by Samiha Tahsin on Mar 31, 2016
Headline for 6 Times Redfern Now Cleverly Showed Us Stand Up For What Is Right
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6 Times Redfern Now Cleverly Showed Us Stand Up For What Is Right

Episode 4 of series one, ‘Stand Up’ proves that you need to follow your own beliefs and stand up for your own rights if you want to create a difference.

2

Do what you believe in.

Do what you believe in.

Joel believes that the Australian National Anthem that is sung at the start of everyday at Clifton Grammar does not represent the Indigenous Australians at all. As a result, Joel refuses to participate in the National anthem and sits down on his seat while the other students stand up to sing the National Anthem. The serious expression on Joel’s face proves that he was assured what he did was the right thing to do. Joel’s English teacher, Mr. Parish said, “We need you to follow the rules, and one of those rules is to sing the National Anthem at assembly.” Joel replied, “Yeah, I know sir. Just doesn’t feel right.” Sometimes people need to view rights from multiple perspectives. Mr. Parish’s actions here prove that he is not viewing rights from Joel’s perspective.

3

Accepting the challenges of life.

Accepting the challenges of life.

Joel goes back to his school after his expulsion. With the support of his parents, he believes that he cannot be expelled from school just because of a song. In this shot, the close-up of Joel shows how confident he is about the decision that has been made by his family and him. Joel’s mum said to Joel, “Me and your father are standing right behind you. You can do this.” Joel’s parents are supporting Joel and they are all working together to stand up for what is right. It proves that we need to be united and work together, so we can have the power to create a difference.

4

Principles are not more important than a person’s life.

Principles are not more important than a person’s life.

After the expulsion of Joel, Mrs. Macann found multiple Indigenous students who were not participating in the National Anthem. She told Mr. Parish, “Deal with those students.” Mr. Parish said “No”. He could not support the decision that Mrs. Macann made to expel Joel just because he wasn’t singing a song. He thought what was done to Joel was injustice. The victorious smile on Mr. Parish’s face proves that he was happy that all the Indigenous students stood up for Joel and what was right. Mr. Parish said to Mrs. Macann, “The bloody song only became the national anthem in 1984. Look at the kids, it means nothing to them.” This is an example of how Mr. Parish has now been able to look at the power structure in the school from different perspective. As an audience, we learn that sometimes we need to compromise to make things fair or better. This example also teaches us that we need to respect and consider others beliefs or values as well as our own.

5

Stand up for the right and against the wrong.

Stand up for the right and against the wrong.

Mrs. Macann threatens the Indigenous students with expulsion if they do not sing the national anthem. She gives the students one last chance and counts to five, waiting for them to stand up and sing their heart out when she gets to five. However, none of them moved. They have decided to stand up for something that is right. Mrs. Macann asks the students about how their parents are going to respond after hearing that they have been expelled. Chloe said, “Miss, you would be wrong there. Our parents are right behind us. They are proud we are standing up for something and if we get expelled, so be it they reckon.” The confident and serious expressions on the students’ face show that they are ready to stand up for their own rights even if they have to be expelled from the school. This sends the audience a message about the responsibility that we have to make sure that the people around us have rights.

6

Creating the difference!

Creating the difference!

Joel is welcomed back by the principal, all the fellow students and teachers. Mrs. Macann comes to Joel’s house by herself to take him back to school. He has created a difference in his life as he does not have to sing the national anthem anymore. Joel’s dad asked the principal, “Just to make sure, he doesn’t have to sing the national anthem?” Mrs Macann replied, “Correct.” The broad smile on Joel’s face proves that he is very happy and proud to be welcomed back at his school and to create the difference (as indicated by the music that was being played in the background). The audience is left to see Joel’s right that he has achieved as he does not have to stand up to sing the National Anthem and nobody can force him to sing the song anymore.

1

The very privileged position.

The very privileged position.

Both of Joel’s parents are proud of their only child (as indicated by the wide eyes and bright smile on their face), Joel, who is a sixteen-year-old teenager. He just won the Indigenous scholarship to Clifton Grammar, which is one of the best private schools of Sydney. Joel’s parents believe that he has a bright future waiting in front of him. Joel’s dad said to Joel, “I am proud of you”, on the first day of his school.