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Updated by Nicole Bahry on Mar 13, 2016
Headline for Endangered Animals
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Nicole Bahry Nicole Bahry
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Endangered Animals

8

The Leatherback Turtle

The Leatherback Turtle

Leatherback turtles are named for their shell, which is leather-like rather than hard, like other turtles. They are the largest sea turtle species and also one of the most migratory, crossing both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Pacific leatherbacks migrate from nesting beaches in the Coral Triangle all the way to the California coast to feed on the abundant jellyfish every summer and fall.

9

The Amur Leopard

The Amur Leopard

People usually think of leopards in the savannas of Africa but in the Russian Far East, a rare subspecies has adapted to life in the temperate forests that make up the northern-most part of the species’ range. Similar to other leopards, the Amur leopard can run at speeds of up to 37 miles per hour. This incredible animal has been reported to leap more than 19 feet horizontally and up to 10 feet vertically.

10

The Saola

The Saola

The saola was discovered in May 1992 during a joint survey carried out by the Ministry of Forestry of Vietnam and WWF in north-central Vietnam. The team found a skull with unusual long, straight horns in a hunter's home and knew it was something extraordinary. The find proved to be the first large mammal new to science in more than 50 years and one of the most spectacular zoological discoveries of the 20th century.

15

The Sumatran Elephant

The Sumatran Elephant

Sumatran elephants feed on a variety of plants and deposit seeds wherever they go, contributing to a healthy forest ecosystem. They also share their lush forest habitat with several other endangered species, such as the Sumatran rhino, tiger, and orangutan, and countless other species that all benefit from an elephant population that thrives in a healthy habitat.

1

All kinds of pandas are endangered due to their lack of population.

All kinds of pandas are endangered due to their lack of population.

Despite the Giant Panda being one of the world's most popular animal, these pandas are threatened by habitat fragmentation.

3

The Black Rhino is on the brig of extinction.

The Black Rhino is on the brig of extinction.

There is only a handful of Black Rhinos still left in the wild. However, reports say that the Black Rhino population numbers are increasing due to the continued conservation effort.

4

The Cross River Gorilla

The Cross River Gorilla

The Cross River Gorilla is Africa’s number one least known and most threatened ape, with only 250-300 individuals remaining. Found only in a small mountainous area located at the headwaters of the River Cross that straddles the border between Cameroon and Nigeria, the Cross River Gorilla is the most western and northern taxon of gorilla.

5

The South China Tiger

The South China Tiger

The South China tiger population was estimated to number 4,000 individuals in the early 1950s. In the next few decades, thousands were killed as the subspecies was hunted as a pest. The Chinese government banned hunting in 1979. By 1996 the population was estimated to be just 30-80 individuals.

6

The Black-footed Ferret

The Black-footed Ferret

Once thought to be globally extinct, black-footed ferrets are making a comeback. For the last thirty years, concerted efforts from many state and federal agencies, zoos, Native American tribes, conservation organizations and private landowners have given black-footed ferrets a second chance for survival. Today, recovery efforts have helped restore the black-footed ferret population to nearly 300 animals across North America.

7

The Vaquita

The Vaquita

Vaquita, the world’s most rare marine mammal, is on the edge of extinction. This little porpoise wasn't discovered until 1958 and a little over half a century later, we are on the brink of losing them forever. Vaquita are often caught and drowned in gillnets used by illegal fishing operations in marine protected areas within Mexico's Gulf of California. More than half of the population has been lost in the last three years.

11

The African Wild Dog

The African Wild Dog

The wild dog is one of the world’s most endangered mammals. The largest populations remain in southern Africa and the southern part of East Africa (especially Tanzania and northern Mozambique).

12

The Pangolin

The Pangolin

These solitary, primarily nocturnal animals, are easily recognized by their full armor of scales. A startled pangolin will cover its head with its front legs, exposing its scales to any potential predator. If touched or grabbed it will roll up completely into a ball, while the sharp scales on the tail can be used to lash out.

13

The Loggerhead Turtle

The Loggerhead Turtle

Loggerhead turtles are named for their large heads that support powerful jaw muscles, allowing them to crush hard-shelled prey like clams and sea urchins. They are less likely to be hunted for their meat or shell compared to other sea turtles. By catch, the accidental capture of marine animals in fishing gear, is a serious problem for loggerhead turtles because they frequently come in contact with fisheries.

14

The Chimpanzee

The Chimpanzee

In their habitat in the forests of central Africa, chimpanzees spend most of their days in the tree tops. When they do come down to earth, chimps usually travel on all fours, though they can walk on their legs like humans for as far as a mile. They use sticks to fish termites out of mounds and bunches of leaves to sop up drinking water.