Updated by Michael Britt on Jun 19, 2014
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Depth Perception Cues

Here's a list of resources all related to how humans perceive depth in an image when, of course, it isn't really there.

Source: http://www.ThePsychFiles.com

Depth Perception Cues | Depth perception

Depth perception is the visual ability to perceive the world in three dimensions ( 3D) and the distance of an object. Depth sensation is the corresponding term for animals, since although it is known that animals can sense the distance of an object (because of their ability to move accurately, or to respond consistently, according to that distance), it is not known whether they "perceive" it in the same subjective way that humans do.

Depth Perception Cues | Psychology 101 - Sensation and Perception Part 3 - Depth Perception

Video from www.Education-portal.com Introductory course for psychology - psych 101.

Depth Perception Cues | An Experiment by Joseph Campos: The Visual Cliff

Check out this video from Volume 3 of the 3 volume vook, Mind in the Making - The Essential Life Skills Every Child Needs, by Ellen Galinsky. To see more, visit vook.com!

Depth Perception Cues | Website Designs with Depth Perception: Wonderful Examples

We are gradually getting used to the fact that professional designers don't have limits; they just simply push boundaries of general conceptions and recreate whatever comes to their minds. One of the best examples confirming this notion is website design with depth perception. Despite the fact that initially it is a two-dimensional medium, nowadays, designers [...]

Depth Perception Cues | What Are Monocular Cues?

Question: What Are Monocular Cues? Answer: Part of depth-perception is the ability to perceive the distance of an object. There are a variety of things that we use to judge how far away an object is. Some of these cues can be processed by just one eye, which is why they are referred to as monocular cues.

Depth Perception Cues | Psychology

The process of perception involves synthesizing, organizing, and interpreting sensory information in a meaningful way. Researchers often describe perceptual processing as occurring in two basic ways. The first is known as bottom-up processing, and it involves making sense of ambiguous information, kind of like assembling the individual pieces of a puzzle when you don't know what the final image will look like.